mothers


Great Mother’s Day lesson plan
by Alan Haskvitz
http://www.edu-cyberpg.com/Ringleaders/al.html

Mother’s Day cars are an excellent teaching tool as well as an opportunity for the students to learn about famous women in history.

The lesson starts with the students developing a list of positive character traits. There are some excellent sites listed below. Next, they research famous women in history and make a list of what traits those women possessed. This can either be done as as a group or as a class project.

After the research is complete the students each have to look at the traits and make a list of those traits that their mother or other care-giver have and the other famous women who shared those traits.

When this research is completed, it usually takes about two days, the students are given card stock and coloring tools and start to create their Mother’s Day cards. On the first page is a list of the famous women with a greeting such as You are Famous, Mom.

On the second or inside cover page is a list of the character traits that the students found. Older students may even be able to provide an example of each significant woman’s trait with a quote or summary of the deed(s).

On page three the student writes Happy Mother’s Day and lists the traits that their mother has and what other famous women share that favorable trait.

When the card is done the teacher needs to check it over for accuracy and offer suggestions as needed.

The result is a Mother’s Day card that is unique and highly appreciated. Depending on the student the project should take a couple of periods for the research and a period for the artwork and finalization.

Here is a site that could help the student start their research. It is about the character traits of Amelia Earhart.
http://ameliaearhartsce.weebly.com/character-traits.html

Famous women in history
Lessons, videos, and more
http://www.nwhm.org/education-resources/

Time for Kids
Famous women stories
http://www.timeforkids.com/minisite/womens-history-month

Excellent list of important women
From Scholastic, short biographies by last name.
http://teacher.scholastic.com/activities/women/notable.htm

What is character?
This article explains character and gives several good examples.
http://www.character-training.com/blog/list-of-character-traits/

For the more traditional approach, here are some tried and true ideas.

Mother’s Day Craft Ideas
http://atozteacherstuff.com/Themes/Mother_s_Day/
http://www.teachingheart.net/mompage.htm

Basic site with brief history of Mothers Day and Projects
http://holidays.mrdonn.org/mothersday.html

Games for Mother’s Day
For younger students
http://www.akidsheart.com/holidays/mday/mdgms.htm

W omen’s Rights lessons
For older students
http://edsitement.neh.gov/view_lesson_plan.asp?id=435

Famous women in math and drivers

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alan_Haskvitz

for more resources go to

http://www.reacheverychild.com/math/index.html

and

http://www.reacheverychild.com/feature/womens_history.html 

Ada Lovelace was responsible for helping to translating documents and adding details to the Babbage’s Analytical Engine. Her work specified a method of calculating numbers with the Engine that is recognized by historians as the world’s first computer program.

Kay McNulty, Betty Snyder, Marlyn Wescoff, Ruth Lichterman, Betty Jennings, and Fran Bilas, were the original programmers of the ENIAC, the Electronic Numerical Integrator and Computer, that was the first large-scale, electronic, digital computer capable of being reprogrammed to solve a full range of computing problems.Rear Admiral Grace Murray Hopper was an American computer scientist and naval officer. She was the first programmer of the Mark I Calculator and developed the first compiler for a computer programming language. She was ultimately made a Commander the Navy.Jean E. Sammet developed the FORMAC programming language as a computer scientist.Sally Floyd helped with Transmission Control Protocol that enables the Internet to operate. 

African American Evelyn Boyd Granville worked on a trajectory analysis for the Mercury and Apollo space projects.

Born a slave in
Tennessee in 1832, Mary Fields delivered the mail by stagecoach In Monday everyday until she was nearly 80 years old.

Latino racer Milka Duno was born in Venezulea and learned to drive by watching her parents. She has competed in many levels of racing including Formula One, IndyCar and sports car racing.

Kitty O’Neil, despite being deaf since she was four-years-old, set the women’s land speed record of 612 miles per hour. She also drove a rocket dragster to the quickest quarter mile elapsed time in history, 3.22 seconds. Lyn St. James was an Indy Car driver. She is just one of a handful of women who have qualified for the Indianapolis 500. St. James was the first woman to win the Indy 500 Rookie of The Year award. She set 31 national and international speed records over her 15 year career in auto racing.

Janet Guthrie is the first woman to earn a starting spot in the
Indianapolis 500 and the Daytona 500, where she was also named the Top Rookie after setting a lap-speed record.  Her helmet and race suit are in the Smithsonian Institution.

 Danica Patrick was fourth in the 2005
Indianapolis 500, making her the top-finishing woman ever at this famous race and she was named rookie of the year. She was the first woman ever to lead a lap at the Indy 500.

Eileen Collins
U.S.A.F. Lt. Col. Eileen Marie Collins is the first woman ever selected to be a space shuttle pilot and the first woman to command a space shuttle.

 

Denise McCluggage earned honors in a variety of races and vehicles. McCluggage was able to master and win in everything from a Ferrari to a rally outfitted Ford Falcon.

Shirley Muldowney was the first driver to repeat as National Hot Rod Association Champion and the first driver to win the Championship three times with her ability to win in her dragster.

 

 

Kindergarten Websites to help children, parents

For more resources go to

http://www.reacheverychild.com

Caring parents want to give their children the best start and there are many avenues for this. Indeed, the first couple of years are the most vital for young children as they learn how to learn and develop interpersonal skills. However, as a teacher there is little I can do until a child reaches school age and that is kindergarten. The resources I have supplied you with are designed to help kindergarten teachers and others find great resources to make school exciting and meaningful.

Before you start you search, I would like to tell you about the research I did and how it impacted my children. Over 20 years ago I discovered that sending a child to school as soon as they were old enough could be a significant problem if that child was the youngest, or among the youngest in the class. As such, I held my daughter back nearly one full year to make sure she was ready for school. The results were astonishing. As a more mature student she was more readily able to grasp the concepts provided, had better coordination, and was more socialized. The teachers quickly recognized her and, as is human nature, pushed her to become more self-reliant. This simple act was ultimately recognized when she took her PSAT examinations where she was selected a National Merit Award Scholar. She has now finished college, her Ivy League diploma in hand all based on a good start.

If your child is immature I recommend you consider the same approach. It may be more expensive to pay for another year of preschool, but the child’s future may be enhanced by your actions. Ask professionals before you make any decision.

Anyway, here are some sites that can be used by pre-schoolers and kindergarten students, parents, and teachers. To save space just click on

http://www.reacheverychild.com/feature/kindergarten.html

Women in history resources

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alan_Haskvitz

I have a lot of lesson plans and interesting materials about women in history here.

http://www.reacheverychild.com/feature/womens_history.html

They include career information, a great many history links to such places as the national woman’s hall of fame, women in uniform, suffrage, women in math, and much more. All free.

Go to http://www.reacheverychild.com  for even more resources

A Great Mother’s Day Lesson Plan

By Alan Haskvitz, national inservice presenter

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alan_Haskvitz

This is a great idea that enables the student to compare their mother to other significant women in history.  

http://www.reacheverychild.com/lessonplans/plan_mother.html