hybrid


Gas Price Are Increasing: Try a Hybrid
by The Car Family

Rising gas prices that are only going to get higher this summer during peak driving season. With average commuting times in the 45-minute range and traffic getting worse perhaps it is time to consider a hybrid sedan that offers between 55 and 70 plus miles per gallon. The Car Family selected two of the highest rated hybrid sedans for quality and fuel mileage, the Prius Prime, and the Hyundai Ioniq.

Hyundai’s Ioniq is a traditional hybrid with a battery pack helping the engine when needed and at low speeds. The Toyota Prime is a plug-in hybrid which uses two battery packs. One is for electric only power for around 25 miles when the main battery pack takes over and helps the gasoline engine as needed with a 70 The Ioniq is rated at 58 mpg and the Toyota can top 70. The joy of the Prime is threefold. First, you may get both state and federal checks and/or tax credits and the Prime also qualifies you for the high occupancy lane sticker, which is priceless some days.

Mom’s view: These cars are perfect for commuter or trips, and both can go over 500 miles between refueling. The average gas mileage of all cars sold in America is about 25 mpg which means that these hybrids can easily cut you fuel budget in half while still providing convenience and a range of safety features. So the big question is, if hybrids are so good, why aren’t they popular? The answer isn’t simple. It could be bad information, the difficulty in breaking habits, not enough room for six, or fear of change. Regardless, the best way is to test drive one yourself. The Hyundai dash and driving experience are more closely related to a regular car. The Prime takes more time to get used to but is easy to master. The Prime exterior is very dramatic while the Ioniq more mundane. Seating in both hybrids was adequate, but certainly not in the luxury category. Parking is a snap, and the rear hatches easy to open; however, the Prime did not have nearly as much cargo space as the Ionig due to the location of Toyota’s battery pack. The Toyota has room for four passengers and the Hyundai five. Within minutes, I was right at home with both cars. The Hyundai has a more typical cockpit while the Prius has the instrument cluster in the center of the dash. The Prius Prime has Toyota Safety Sense which includes pedestrian detection, lane departure alert with steering assist, radar cruise control and rearview camera. The Ioniq with the Ultimate Package has the same capabilities. The Hyundai interior is quite simple and familiar. The Prime requires some adjustments from the short shifting knob to the center-mounted instrument cluster. I would like either hybrid and with rebates, they are both attractive buys and lease rates are favorable.

Dad’s view: These vehicles have instant torque that makes on-ramp and passing situations less stressful. Consumer Reports and the JD Powers rate these models highly in terms of quality. Ride feel is very good and the steering inspires confidence. The stop-start feature is seamless and the regenerating brakes have a solid feel. The cars get to 60 mph in about ten seconds and handle extremely well. The big difference is that Toyota’s Hybrid Synergy Drive uses an electric continuously variable transmission formula while the Hyundai has a six-speed dual clutch automatic that delivers a more normal driving feel.

Young man’s view: The Prime is loaded with technology. You get a large 11.6-inch display compatible with Siri Eyes-Free and Toyota’s Entune App Suite that offers Pandora, traffic, and weather while the Ioniq hybrid with the Ultimate package has an 8-inch touch screen with Android Auto and Apple CarPlay and Hyundai’s Blue Link. The Prius Prime Advanced comes with Prime Apps, which can manage your charging status, locate a charging station, change the interior temperature, and locate your vehicle. Hyundai’s Blue Link basically does all that Prime Apps could do as well as integrate with Amazon Alexa, Apple Watch and Android Wear watches. Both cars have wireless charging for your phone. Voice recognition is so-so in the Ioniq.

Young working woman’s view: If you plug in the Prime you can expect between 20 and 25 battery powered miles while the Hyundai does not have the extra batter. The trade-off is in the price as the Ioniq starts in the low $20,000s and the Prime in the $30,000 range. Is it worth the extra money for the high occupancy lane, government rebates, and better mileage? Well, for 909 readers that decision requires some serious math time. Since I do not have access to an outlet where I could plug-in the Prime the Ioniq would be the best choice. However, if I did the Toyota would be my winner.

Family conference: Hyundai is bringing out a plug-in hybrid to challenge the Prius Prime but as of now the hybrid is the most efficient family vehicle they offer. The warranty on the Hyundai is excellent with a lifetime promise whereas the Toyota is more limited. Pricing is also in the Hyundai’s court costing nearly $10,000 less. However, the Prius Prime is essentially loaded and the base Hyundai needs several options to be competitive. The bottom line is that the Prius Prime is best if you have a place to plug it in and can afford the extra cost. Otherwise, the Hyundai is a good choice with excellent cargo space and is more responsive on the open road. Either way, you are going to be visiting gasoline stations much less with a fill-up yielding over 500 miles or more from their 11 gallon tanks.

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Prius Prime: 70 mpg at 70 mph
by The Car Family
For more reviews go to https://www.motorists.org/tag/the-car-family/

Forgot the old Prius, the new Prius Prime is better in every way except for the interior room. It handles well, has frisky acceleration, and is loaded with features. The larger battery is good for 25 miles of electric-powered go and you can fill up the 11.3-gallon tank on regular and go over 600 miles. Indeed, it was easy for us to get 70 miles per gallon at freeway speeds and even better results when the traffic got stickier. Some may decry its busy exterior, but the beauty here is on the inside where it counts. Yes, there are a few other suitors for the environmentally conscious from Hyundai and Chevrolet, but they do not offer the proven reliability of this Toyota. As for interior space, the new Prime battery pack takes up passenger space limiting the cargo capacity and back seat room. It is well worth the sacrifice.

We have been enthusiastic about Prius since it came out in the 1990s, and we are just as excited about this new model. It is quieter and easier to maneuver. However, the larger battery pack takes longer to charge using a 110 outlet requiring about six hours of plug-in time to get the full benefits of the electric battery range whereas the previous model could be topped off in three. A 240 line is noticeably faster, but may require residential rewiring.

Be aware that before you buy a Prius Prime your state may have incentives to encourage their use, including high-occupancy lane usage. The federal government also gives you a tax advantage such as a $2500 tax credit for the Toyota. In addition, every vehicle rating service names the Prius as one of the most dependable cars you can own. For example, in 25,000 miles of travel, our car had 80 percent of its brake pads remaining as the Prius used the regenerative braking to help with stopping.

Our test vehicle was the Advanced model that lists for about $34,000. You can order the Premium model ($28,800) and still get the 11.6-inch central touch screen, and a power driver seat, keyless entry/start, and wireless smartphone charging. There is also the entry-level Plus ($ 27,000) with considerably fewer features.

Mom’s view: Make sure to order the Star Safety System that includes ABS, traction control, brake assist for emergency stopping power, stability control, and electronic brake force distribution that equalizes stopping force to each wheel. I especially like the Smart Stop Technology that automatically halts the vehicle when both the accelerator and the brake pedal are pressed at the same time. Parking is a breeze with a 33.4 radius. Safety wise you get LED headlights and taillights, heated door mirrors, programmed grille shutters, navigation, automatic climate control, heated front seats, a proximity key and push-button start plus airbags everywhere. It is a joy to park, but the rear hatch lift over is a little high. The Prius Prime Advanced featured a heated steering wheel, color head-up display, an auto-dimming rearview mirror, parking sensors, self-parking system, and blind-spot monitoring, adaptive cruise control, forward-collision warning, automated emergency braking, more powerful headlights, automatic high-beams, and lane-departure warning with a lane-keeping assist.

Dad’s view: The ride on the new Prius has dramatically improved with independent MacPherson strut front suspension and double-wishbone style multi-link rear suspension with front and rear stabilizer bars. The electric steering is excellent, and the electric motors and four-cylinder gas engine work to provide a nimble and satisfying ride. If you need more power, such as for passing, clicking the Power button will bring plenty of acceleration. The Prius Prime is a joy to drive on longer trips as the seats have been improved. One of the biggest problems we had was forgetting to check the gas gauge and were shocked one day to notice the fuel warning light illuminated. Fifteen dollars later, we had a full tank and another 600 miles plus of trouble-free driving. The Prime has a plug-in port to charge the 8.8-kWh lithium-ion battery pack that enables an EPA-rated 25 miles of electric-only driving range. The combination of electric and gas propulsion and the continuously variable automatic transmission are nearly undetectable. Even when the Prius automatically turns off when stopped in traffic, there is no jerky movement as is common in the competition. The lithium-ion battery pack resides under the rear seats and weighs 265 pounds. Except for the noise from the tires chosen for gas mileage maximization vs quiet ride, the Prius Prime Advanced is easily the best and most reliable plug-in hybrid you can buy. In the past, the resale has been excellent as well. If you are worried the battery pack, it has a ten-year or eight-year warranty, depending on your state’s standards.

Young working woman’s view: This is a four-passenger sedan and the seats are comfortable. One can choose among a couple of setting depending on your needs while driving. The EV Auto mode is your best choice. Among your other choices are select Eco (very slow) or Power (very fast). The interior is well done and there are a variety of storage bins and plugs. I like the Prius Prime, but living in a condo I do not have access to an electric outlet, and thus the regular Prius would be my choice. Overall, easy to park, maneuver, and does not attract undue attention from ne’re-do-wells.

Young working male’s view: Toyota continues with its dash centered display, but the images are nearly invisible if you are wearing polarized glasses. The Advanced model has semi autonomous parking and an excellent 11.6-inch LCD touch screen that works well. Thankfully, there is a volume control knob. The JBL sound system is adequate. The inductive phone-charging pad in the center console, but the white color of the charging surfaces is a bit much. The large monitor looks good, but just means another layer of learning before you get accustomed to it. For example, the lower half of the display is buried at the bottom of the screen when you are using the GPS map. There is an abundance of audio alarms that need to be addressed before leaving the dealership. You are notified when a window is down when parked or a lane is being crossed without a turn signal on and a variety of other warnings. Finally, according to our local Toyota dealer, the Prius Prime plug-in chord costs over $1000 so keep good care of it.

Family conference: We highly recommend the Prius Prime to those who drive in heavy commuter traffic and still want to take a long vacation knowing that the Prius has excellent mileage, features, quality, and resale. Don’t let is futuristic exterior deter you from considering this gas sipper. It has a heart of gold and lithium-ion.

Kia Hybrids: Ready for Higher Gas Prices.
by The Car Family
for more reviews go to https://www.motorists.org/tag/the-car-family/

This is the best time to look into hybrids with new fuel taxes on the horizon and no better place to start are with the new Kia Niro SUV and Kia Optima starting at $22,890 and $25,995 while pushing past 40 mpg. No doubt these Kias with their exceptional reliability rating and stellar warranty are worth considering especiallyconsidering the average new car is going for $32,000.

With most readers having an average one-way commute time of over 30 minutes and 15 percent spending an hour in traffic these hybrids are ideal, essentially offering savings up to 50 percent in fuel savings over typical competitors.

Kia Niro Hybrid Overview: This is a subcompact SUV and is priced under most of the hybrid competition. You can average nearly 50 mpg overall which is outstanding for a car this versatile. It has a slightly higher stance and comfortable seats, but the real star is the way six-speed, dual-clutch automatic transmission shifts.

2017 Niro – Red

Kia Optima Hybrid overview: The 2017 is new and appealing offering a calm driving experience, plenty of cargo room and 40 mpg average. Loaded with technology such as Apple CarPlay and Android Auto and safety features that include autonomous emergency braking. The ride is quiet and you get 13.4 cubic feet of storage with a lot of inside bins for personal items. Although the exterior is not as exciting as some competitors, it nevertheless looks sleek and should age well. You can also get an Optima plug-in.

2017 Optima Hybrid

Mom’s view: The Niro is fun, but get the EX model as it offers so much more with heated seats, blind spot monitoring and an abundance of other safety and convenience features. The less expensive FE is the mileage champ, but a warm bottom is well worth the extra for the upgraded model. You can get the more loaded Touring and Touring Launch as well, but their isn’t any all wheel drive option on any model. The back seats of the EX fold down giving you ample room for packages. The Optima hybrid allows you to select Eco or Sport mode outside of the standard setting. Eco takes the edge off driving and gives you superior mileage, but the cost is more relaxed acceleration. Sport brings the Optima on boil and is excellent for passing or lane merging.

2017 Optima Hybrid interior

Dad’s view: The Niro is a 1.6 liter four-cylinder gas-electric hybrid with 6-speed dual-clutch automatic drive train. It is fun to drive, but it isn’t going to set any speed records. The brakes on both vehicles take a while to get used to as they regenerate the batteries. This is good as it save on brake wear, but can be abrupt at times until a gentle touch is mastered. Steering is quite good and makes the Niro nimble and corners well. The electric motor works with the transmission and makes driving in heavy traffic easy. The Optima has an electric motor and 2.0-liter engine that combine to produce 192 hp. While most hybrids have a continuously variable transmission, but the Optima Hybrid sticks with a six-speed automatic transmission for a more traditional shifting feel.

Young working woman’s view: The Niro isn’t as comfortable to drive as the larger Optima with the latter being quieter as well. The Optima seats are fairly flat and so heavier drivers will find them a good fit. Entering and exiting both cars is easy, but the larger doors on the Optima make it a long reach to close at times. Both cars are good for those with mobility problems with just a little step over to get into a seat. The slopping roof of the Optima restricts rear vision, but the excellent rear view camera takes care of that problem. Interestingly, the vehicles are loaded with pockets for caring everything from large water bottles to small handwipes. As similar as these two Kia products are they appeal to a very different buyer. The Niro is handy and versatile. Perfect for the active family. The Optima is larger and more gentrified, perfect for those who like a quieter ride and more space. I like larger cars, but worry about mall parking lots. The special rear and skyward views on the monitor relieves that stress.

2017 Niro interior

Back to school male’s view: Working on my computer security certificate, but in the meantime the Kia’s offered some excellent technology, although the GPS was a bit slow. We had the Harman Kardon system, which was fine, and the optional wireless smartphone charging worked well. There is an adaptive cruise control and voice control, including Siri. My choice would be the handy Niro. Looks good, handy, and fuel frugal.
Family conference: The front-wheel-drive Optima hybrid has been restyled this year and improved in many areas and the Niro is all new. Kia’s warranty is special with a basic five year/60,000 coverage and roadside assistance and 10 years and 100,000 miles on the powertrain. Kia ranks highest among all automotive industry nameplates in the J.D. Power 2016 U.S. Initial Quality Study and this is the first time a non-luxury brand has led the industry. Others to consider are the Toyota RAV4 and the Nissan Rogue.

Toyota’s Top Hybrids: Prius and RAV4
by The Car Family
for more reviews go to https://www.motorists.org/tag/the-car-family/
Toyota RAV 4 and the Prius have provided consumers with a nice combination of utility and frugality with both cars offering room for a young family and exceptional fuel mileage. Both vehicles have a lot in common from pricing, to Hybrid Synergy Drive powertrains to class leading fuel mileage in the over 50 mpg for the Prius and 30 for the RAV. Indeed, if you are after economical travel these two are tough to top.

Prius Tourning

Prius Tourning

RAV4 Hybrid

RAV4 Hybrid

Of course, the real reason hybrids are popular is their fuel mileage. However, buyers need to do some math homework with several important variables to consider. First, how much more is the hybrid going to cost over a similar vehicle. The government has a handy site that simplifies this math at fueleconomy.gov.
With that in mind we tested two of the best hybrids from the most successful hybrid company in the world, Toyota. We weren’t disappointed.
Mom’s view: The RAV4 hybrid is easy to drive, park, and use. It can seat five, but is only available in the more expensive trim models. I wasn’t impressed with the RAV’s interior as it just looks and feels dated. I did like the utility tray and storage areas and the easy to use automatic rear hatch. You loose a little cargo area with the hybrid, but still get between 35 to 70 cubic feet of room depending if the rear seat is lowered. Safety wise, the RAV4 top of the line Limited includes antilock brakes, stability and traction control, front side airbags, full-length airbags, a driver knee airbag, rearview camera, blind-spot warning system and rear cross-traffic alert. An optional Advanced Technology package that includes an 11-speaker JBL premium audio system with a top-down-view parking camera system is also worth considering. We tested the Prius Four Touring model that has a much improved electronics and is loaded with safety features, too, with a blind spot monitor, rear cross-traffic alert and air-bags most everywhere. My only problem with the new Prius was the white, really white, center console, and losing some rear seat leg room due to the placement of the batteries. Otherwise a really great car. My opinion is that the RAV4 is an excellent all-around family vehicle and the Prius, and I hate to write this, a really fun sedan. Both cars have excellent quality scores.

Dad’s view: The RAV 4 hybrid is all wheel drive and is the most fuel efficient vehicle in its class. The ride is excellent and, best of all, aggressive pricing makes it difficult to pass by for bargain hunters. The brakes take a bit to get used to as they are regenerative, but almost all hybrids have a similar feel. The RAV4 has the same system as Lexus NX uses and it shows. This is the best hybrid in its class for cargo and mileage. The ride is smooth and fairly quiet, but can be rough over tax-money deprived roads Driving the hybrid is enjoyable once you get used to the thrust the electric motors provide. All in all the RAV4 is a tidy SUV with a 2.5-liter four-cylinder engine, electric motors front and rear and a continuously variable transmission. The result is 194 horsepower SUV that uses front-wheel drive in normal operation, but automatically engages the electrically driven rear wheels when needed. In other words, a perfect vehicle for readers who want to be prepared for whatever nature throws at them while still being fuel frugal. The Prius is powered by a 1.8-liter four-cylinder engine aided by a pair of electric motor/generators. Using the console mounted power button maximizes thrust making it easier to pass and merge. In fact, it is addicting. However, the best feature in this new Prius is its improved brakes, suspension and driving dynamics. My choice would be the Prius because it is fun to drive and consistently get 50 plus mpg. With its 11 gallon gas tank full of unleaded a 500 mile trip will cost under $25 and no TSA waiting line.

Young working girls’ view: Neither car is beautiful, but both have an inner beauty and that is reliability. The RAV4 is spacious and honest and doesn’t try to fool you into thinking you are driving a luxury car. I found the Prius too difficult to get into with its lower entry and the unique center gauge placement wasn’t to my taste. The RAV4 hybrid was much easier and, with certain options, was a breeze to park. I would definitely get Toyota Safety Sense that includes collision alert, lane departure warning, pedestrian detection, radar cruise control and more. I really liked the intelligent park assist that can be used for both perpendicular and parallel parking especially living in a parking challenged city. The cargo space is very generous and rear seat room was ample. A perfect SUV for a single or young family who love to travel winter or summer.
2016_Toyota_Prius_Four_inter

Young working male’s view: Both hybrids are loaded with electronic choices that make option selections difficult. For example, one package includes larger wheels, parking senors, and heated seats. No substitutions allowed. One thing I would get is Toyota’s Entune with the bigger 7-inch screen, smartphone-connected services,and a navigation. Not the best, but much improved, and make sure you get help with the set-up and tie-in with your cell phone. As much as I liked the vastly improved Prius driveability, the RAV just appealed to me more for its usefulness.

RAV4 Interior

RAV4 Interior

Family conference: Loaded with safety features, both priced similarly, the choice between the RAV 4 and Prius Touring hybrids is basically perception. Are you bold enough to make the Prius your daily driver or does the utility of the RAV4 hold sway. Either way they are unique and family friendly.

Using vehicles to create student interest in math and Language Arts
by National Hall of Fame Teacher Alan Haskvitz
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alan_Haskvitz

Using vehicles is an excellent way to motivate students and to help ready them for real life buying decisions. The following links deal with the various manufactures where students can write for information, obtain pricing information and to harvest compare and contrast data for Common Core related essays.

A listing of all DMV offices.
Finding the office that deals with your state and others can provide information on how old one needs to be to drive as well as the various license fee data that could be used for Common Core math problems. I have used driver manuals to motivate students to read.
http://www.dmv.org/

Data on fuel economy
This federal site would enable students to select a variety of vehicles and there fuel mileage. This could be used for math as well as to provide statistics for an essay on the best or worst type of vehicles in terms of fuel costs.
http://www.fueleconomy.gov/

A link site to manufacturers who sell cars in America
http://search.ezilon.com/united_states/business/automotive/auto_manufacturers/

A listing of vehicle websites worldwide
http://autopedia.com/html/MfgSites.html

National Motorists Association
A great source of information on driving and the law.
http://www.motorists.org/

A listing of car value prices
A good place to find statistics for math problems about the prices of cars and motorcycles.
http://www.nadaguides.com/

Where cars are made by location
Great way to teach geography.
http://www.caranddriver.com/features/a-graphic-representation-of-whats-really-made-in-america-feature

Last Year for Prius Plug-In; Hopefully not Forever
by
The Car Family

Good-Bye Old Friend

Good-Bye Old Friend

Toyota is making some bold moves lately, and we aren’t talking about pulling up stakes in California and moving to Texas, but it ending production of its much loved, but pricey, Prius Plug-In. The 2015 will be the last year for this model as Toyota looks to rethink, redesign, and reimagine what The Car Family believes was the best commuter car you could buy. Period.

To give you an example of what the model provided, it got a real world, daily use, mixed driving use, multiple driver use, 67 mpg average. The electric bill was only $4 extra a month using the off-peak hours feature. And, in some states the Plug-In was eligible for the coveted high occupancy permit saving an average of ten to twenty minutes of travel time on a typical commute. Add to that the high resale value, about 60 percent after three years, the exceptional cargo capacity, ease of loading, and ability to be parked in the smallest of spaces and you have a winner.

That being said, Toyota is facing more competition and is apparently rethinking the extra engineering and cost of a plug-in version to the insanely popular Prius. The cost of this option has already placed the plug-in over $5000 of the price of a Camry hybrid, although the Camry didn’t have the plug-in feature.

We shall miss what Plug-in owners affectionately call the PIP, and wonder how many potential buyers were opt for a non-Toyota product to replace it. One thing for sure, Toyota has weighed that decision well and is apparently willing to gamble that a new, improved version may attract PIP owners back into the fold in a few years. Stay tuned.

Lexus CT 200h: Thrifty, Nimble, and Stylish
For more reviews go to http://www.motorists.org/carfamily/

An inexpensive Lexus might sound like an oxymoron, but that is what the Lexus CT 200 h is and with it comes the attributes the marque has brought to buyers including vehicle quality and buyer satisfaction ratings that top the charts, as well as a frugality usually associated with the ubiquitous Toyota Prius. Of course, there are some caveats with this Lexus and they are in it diminutive size and it performance. Nevertheless, if you want a good looking hatchback that can get you a combined 42 mpg with the Lexus treatment the CT is your only choice. Helping make it an interesting choice is the utility of its four-door hatchback body style that make it an ideal choice for commuting, runs to the vet, or a weekend escape. 2014_Lexus_CT_200h_020

The CT 200h is very athletic and trim making it capable of being piloted through crowded mall parking lots as well as canyon runs with equal aplomb. Don’t expect exuberant response because the 134 horsepower engine is designed with economy in mind. The good news is that the pricing of this Lexus is exceptional. Indeed, you can acquire this Lexus for less money a well equipped Prius, although the latter may have more interior space and better fuel ratings. The Lexus comes standard with alloy wheels, automatic headlights, heated mirrors and puddle lamps, a sunroof, keyless ignition and entry, dual-zone automatic climate control, an eight-way power driver seat, split-folding rear seats, Bluetooth phone and audio connectivity, Siri Eyes Free technology that connects to select smartphones and a six-speaker sound system with a CD player, satellite radio and a USB/iPod interface. Options include a Seat Comfort, and Premium, Leather, Navigation package features a rearview camera, voice-controlled navigation system, Display Audio and F Sport package for those who want the go fast look.

Mom’s view: The CT is an interesting four passenger hatchback that has a cool, almost retro look. Very intuitive and its hybrid feature makes commuting effortless. Although the ride height is quite low, the visibility is good and the turning radius tight enough to make U-turns effortless. Safetywise, the Lexus has antilock disc brakes, stability and traction control, and airbags everywhere. Lexus’ telematics system automatically provides collision notification, stolen-vehicle location and emergency assistance. Most importantly, the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety gave the CT 200h its highest rating of “Good” in moderate-overlap frontal-offset, side-impact and roof strength, and for whiplash protection. Overall, you get a Lexus that does most everything well at a bargain price.

Dad’s view: Power for the 2015 Lexus CT 200h hybrid isn’t overwhelming, but when the electric motors and gasoline engine are united freeway merging and passing aren’t a concern. The CVT is excellent and keeps the 98-horsepower 1.8-liter Atkinson-cycle four-cylinder engine on task. Handling is a good as most hybrids, especially the good feel of the steering and brakes. Very competent for what it is. The ride is compliant, but don’t expect the same level of quietness that is in the more expensive Lexus models. Still, it is enjoyable to drive and grows on you. The CT is like a secret that more people should know about as it provides a fun ride with frugality, exceptional suspension, comfort and quality of the Lexus brand without the big bottom line.

Young working woman’s view: The controls are fairly easy to master, but the control for the info-entertainment entries takes a while to learn as it uses a unique mouse-like interface and a joystick to move the cursor on the screen. It provides excellent feel, though. Interestingly, despite its size, the backseat has an amazing amount of leg and head room. The doors, however, are a bit slim so entry wearing a dress requires some practice. The glovebox and door pockets are diminutive, but the backseats can be folded down to provide access to nearly 35 cubic feet of cargo area. I really liked the smoothness of the CT as it switched between electric and gas modes and auto stop-start functions smoothly. BMW and Porsche could learn from Lexus in this regard. You can select three different driving modes from normal for day to day outings, Eco for crowded commuting, and Sport for a more aggressive feel.
2014_Lexus_CT_200h_040

Young married man’s view: Finally got hitched and this would make a fine addition to the family. The CT has several features I admire such where Lexus claimed to use bamboo speaker frames and trim items made from plant materials. Although it looks small, once inside it does not feel that way. With the requirement that all news cars have backup cameras next year I was surprised that this was still part of an option package on the CT. That aside, I found the optional voice-command HDD tilt-screen navigation system with remote controller, the Enform emergency notification system, NavTraffic to be easy to use and quick to respond. The joystick control actually provides feel as you move it about. Very cool.

Family conference: The 2015 Lexus CT 200h is the most affordable Lexus with a starting around $33,000 and we have seen some models well loaded for this price. For that you get a handy little rig that enjoys pleasing its owner whether it is sipping fuel, parking in the smallest of spaces, or just making you proud every time you enjoy the many luxury features. A great way to reduce your carbon footprint, too.

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