high school


The Most Difficult Student to Teach
by National Hall of Fame Teacher Alan Haskvitz
http://www.findingdulcinea.com/features/profiles/h/alan-haskvitz.html

He was young, bright, and failing school.

A year after finishing the eighth grade he failed high school and was sent to a continuation school. There, I noticed his writing talent, gave him an old computer, and worked to get him into a small, high school program where he could get the attention he needed. I went to the principal of his school and told her of my plans. She was thrilled and brought him in to discuss the possibilities. The only thing he had to do was continue not be a discipline problem. The next day he got into a fight over a pencil. End of story.

He won. He liked his life. No expectations, no school related stress, and no fear of failure. This is the most difficult child to teach. The reasons are simple and complex. Unlike students who have been diagnosed with a learning concern, these students don’t have any measurable problems that can be ascertained by testing. They simply win by losing. They see a test not as a measurement of what they know, how to improve, and to guide future methods to help them, but as a waste of time that can only end badly if they try. They know they have the power to fail and it they do, it was of there own choosing. Some may call it passive aggressive, but it reality it all aggressive. They are in charge and let the devil take the hindmost. Within minutes they are done with the test and sit idly by trying not to draw attention. Bubble tests offer them the ability to make designs with the answer sheets. Essay tests enable them to write about issues that are not related to the subject, but make it look like they are working. Going to the bathroom requests are frequent and finding ways to hide and use cell phones provide the only challenge that a quiet room provides.

The results are no surprise to the parent, teacher, or student. Indeed, most schools advocate simplifying the requirements, giving the student extra help, and even after school detention. It is the latter that provides the most joy to the hardcore. For there they meet others who could care less. Not all the students, but he or she only needs one to rationalize their efforts and maximize the benefits of failing by providing socialization possibilities. By the end of high school, if they make it, the system has provided them with hundreds of hours of special help, thousands of dollars worth of remedial books and media, and has pushed them out into life. They have won even if they are not allowed to graduate because they have beaten the system. They remain in charge.

These students have made the legendary, “not working to potential” comment a staple on report cards and parent meetings. To the student this means they have ability and confirms what they have known all along. The amount of ability, the ability to show it, the ability to use it in a useful manner are all the teacher’s responsibility to measure and maximize.

This syndrome, if you will, is not just for low or average achievers, it is also for some of those labeled gifted. It is this latter group where this winning by losing is most evidence because some schools heap more work on those identified as high achievers. There is a dramatic difference between high achievers and those identified as gifted in some cases. The achiever loves the game and loves to win. The gifted student may just want to blend in or face the competition and simply does poorly. These students come in all shapes and flavors, but the one thing low achieving, highly gifted students have in common is the belief that in the end everything will be okay.

Many teachers have seen the same scenario, especially when students take tests. They know if they do well they are going to be challenged and, if the scores are high enough, even lose friends. Students know the game and play it well. I have seen them complete a two hour state test in 15 minutes with no regrets. When the results come in they shrug it off and return to the lifestyle they have learned to enjoy. No stress, no expectations, and best of all no need to change. Change is frightening and these students have found a way to avoid it and thus new challenges. They like their comfort and responsibilities aren’t a concern now that they have proven that they aren’t any good at meeting society’s expectations for them.

Smart? You better believer it. They have the system mastered. While other students are working away trying to prove they are the best, these students cliche together and enjoy themselves without the worries school usually provides. They have realized that if you do well you only court disappointment and they also fear losing control. Ironically, the only control they have over their future is to fail and using that method that don’t lose control. They can control their expectations and gain approval from their peers. Best of all they can shrug off that bright label and its expectations.

It is important to note that failure is not the student’s term, but one society places on them by grading them on things they don’t value. Not working to potential is an overworked term to imply that the individual in question has the same potential as others regardless of that individual’s self-imposed value.

Some students don’t fear success as much as they fear it’s ramifications. Doing well puts the onus on them to continue to do well, even improve. It also can cut into their social life and may even create a classic Catch 22. If I do well I shall have to do better and better. If I don’t do well I don’t have to stress.
High expectations aren’t for everyone. Some students just want to remain uncalled upon. “I don’t know” is their code word for don’t ask me anymore because I don’t want the attention good or bad. The goal is to hide among the masses.

The good news for students who fail to succeed is that they can capitalize on apathy and make it their stock and trade. When the test comes the student simply does not care. I am not good at math is an explanation they have learned works. Failing because one simply does not care is better then facing a challenge where the results of studying might be failure. It is better not to care and not be surprised. These students aren’t lazy, they work at not doing well. They have all the answers to avoiding it. “I forgot”, “I don’t understand”, and other rationalizations have worked for them. They simply do not have the courage to change. It isn’t self-esteem, it is a lack of understanding, foresight if you will, of the value of success to society. It has been said all students want to learn, but the reality is that they may not want to learn what you are offering. They want to count, but without a clear appreciation of what is at stake failure becomes acceptable. Let’s face it, a good grade means little these days. The difference between a B and a D isn’t worth staying up late and losing friends. To these students a D isn’t a disappointment, it is a victory. They didn’t fail and who really wants to be on the honor role anyway.

A common trait of these students is usually the fact that they are street smart, but have limited math and language art skills. As the school years went by they found themselves falling behind more and may have reached the conclusion that it really didn’t make any difference how well they did because they wouldn’t measure up. In many cases parents are also feed-up having tried several types of motivation without success. Parent-teacher conferences were tedious and repetitious with educators noting the lack of achievement and offering up a few suggestions all of which the parent had heard frequently.

Smart students don’t care if they pass or fail or fall somewhere in between. Threats of repeating the year hold little value to them. Worse, if they do fail next year’s teachers are probably going to have a student in their class who could be disruptive to the others and a behavior problem. Is the system going to fail them two years in a row? They know this won’t happen and so their goal just might be to get kicked out putting more pressure on the parent and a loss of income for the school.

Schools are caught in a quandary with these students. If they follow Piaget’s theory that they will learn when they are ready to learn and promote all students failure is not an option and threatening a student just makes them more hardened to such talk.

To overcome this consistent failure to buckle down to society’s standards requires a paradigm shift in education. Schools must learn to accept failure from some students and be willing to use it as a starting point. Failure is the leading cause of progress. To error is not failure, but a starting point. The only true failure in school is expecting that all students are the same. Hence standards based testing is essentially useless to these students. They don’t care. The problems that the system must solve are how to motivate them, how to measure this success, and how to justify this to the public.

To overcome the “I don’t give a damn” attitude requires some decisive action that may be out of the mainstream and thus expensive, time consuming, and frequently frustrating. If you follow the idea of multiple intelligences you cannot help but being struck by the fact that most people are better at some things. The problem is finding what they are better at and developing a plan to exploit this weakness in the bright child’s armor.
The student needs to be taught about themselves. Why? Because they may think that they are unique and their problems are different. The reality is that their problems might not be common place, but they are seldom unique. That does not mean they should be ignored, but they can benefit from learning about problems others have overcome. For example, Abraham Lincoln’s many failures. (http://www.abrahamlincolnonline.org/lincoln/education/failures.htm)


Ways to Help Reach Them

I recommend that following plan when dealing with deliberate non-achievers. First, involve them in the decision making. Tomorrow we are going to read a story about people who burn books to keep others ignorant. Here is brief outline of Fahrenheit 451. Do you think the students would like to guess at what the title means before reading it or after? Engagement is crucial in motivation. Asking students to develop questions about the material and showing them how to create these questions is a plus. Giving the questions to other students to answer is also engaging.

Relate assignments to real life when possible. Books are being banned. Here is a list of them. How do you see the relationship between those who burn books and those who ban them? Is banning the book the same as having parental guidance on records? Write an essay on why such warnings are needed or not and when we are done we can write to a record industry official and see what they say.

This type of lesson can result in discussions of the Constitution and Bill of Rights and helps feed the skeptical nature that some students have because they don’t feel empowered. Having lessons that can attempt to change society are very motivational to these students.

Learning from errors is what schools should be for. Remember, failure is the first step on the road to success. However, humor is also important. Bright non-achievers usually have an aversion to making errors and so they don’t try. Thus they feel they control the situation. It is the same tactic that students use when they reply that they don’t know to a question even if they do because they don’t want to get involved. This is why I recommend not using red markers and giving students a variety of ways to show they know the material. Some students might be motivated to improve by having their marks read out loud and some may be chagrined. The toughest students to teach don’t care and if they do well frequently say, “I didn’t even study” to assure their position at the bottom on the class.

These students have another universal code word and that is “boring.” Unfortunately, it is true. Most lessons taught are boring. There is very little that can be used to motivate a student outside of parent pressure, love of the subject matter, or desire to please someone, even the teacher. The latter is vital and the reason that good teachers are often subject to undue pressure brought about by students telling others whatever it takes to get them out of the class. Administrators essentially have a choice of believing the child and/or parent and the teacher. It is easier to move the student. The transfer seldom results in improved grades, but alleviates pressure and that is why the tough to teach student uses it. As for why a subject or lesson is boring is almost always because of two reasons. First, they see no need to know the material. Secondly, it requires too much effort. Students used to memorizing answers, asking friends what was on the test, and spending hours figuring out ways to cheat are seldom happy when confronted with something that is out of their control. Asking why that is the right answer or wrong answer is tough. Especially for those why rely on the “I don’t know” evasive reply.

In an attempt to avoid this the teacher might consider giving students a choice of lessons that teach the same subject matter. Sites such as Awesome Stories (https://www.awesomestories.com/) are prefect for this. The stories are high interest, plentiful, and provide a variety of ways to reach a goal. Proof of learning can also be expanded to include the traditional essay, writing online stories, Khan Academy website (https://www.khanacademy.org/) type tutorials where they teach others, songs, poetry, and more that transcend boring. Here are some examples based on Bloom’s Taxonomy (http://buhlercc.wikispaces.com/Bloom’s+Taxonomy) In my classroom I have students create museums, newspapers, miniature golf courses, tattooed arms, and musicals to allow students to show mastery of the subject.

Critical thinking is an interesting term in that the person has to have the knowledge to think critically before they can apply it. For example, a mechanic must find out why the engine does not work. Without a working knowledge of the engine their can be no critical thinking. That is why the hard to reach student must learn the value of being skeptical. When you add this to their usual positive response to the absurd you can develop students who start to look for the disconnects in lessons and society. I make fun of fairy tales, for example, and that usually gets them to start rethinking what has been accepted by them in the past. This contrarian point of view also works in math class as well. Giving students the answer a question and having them write the question results in their striving to apply their learning in ways that they have not experienced before.

Conclusion: I would suggest that winning by losing attitude is the prerogative of the student and to overcome this learned behavior requires changes in methodology and require a teacher to have patience and the ability to try different approaches. Time consuming, yes, but once mastered the lessons flow and the results are dramatic. Start slowly with these students by empowering them and inviting them to take part in the process. After that tilt the lesson so that it requires a fresh outlook with no wrong answers. The little Dutch boy who stuck his finger in the dike to save the community is a grand example of getting these students involved. http://www.dutchcoachapproach.com/The_Dutch_Coach_Approach/A_brave_Dutch_boy.html

After reading this to them ask them why this was a stupid thing to do? Ask them what they would have done instead? Next read them this
“True! Of course it is! […] I have given you the story just as Mother told it to me, years ago. Why, there is not a child in Holland who does not know it. And […] you may not think so, but that little boy represents the spirit of the whole country. Not a leak can show itself anywhere either in its politics, honor, or public safety, that a million fingers are not ready to stop it, at any cost. “

Now the teacher can relate this to a number of readings and even tie in math, geography, and political science. There is the potential to consider whether the quote was a primary source and why it wasn’t. The point is that the lesson isn’t boring and the learning potential is vast. The non-productive student can be called on to design a medal, create a poem or song, write an editorial, or even design an outfit the Dutch boy might have worn as well as writing an opinion of why it was good or bad.

Bottom line: Empower the students, keep the lessons unique, and be prepared to challenge yourself. Finally, share your outcomes with others to gain feedback and solicit changes. Remember that they may be the most difficult students to teach, but they can be the most rewarding.

Clever Boys Dumb Down
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education/educationnews/5071005/Clever-boys-dumb-down-to-avoid-being-bullied-study-claims.html

Discipline: training that perfects the mental faculties

Ten Skills Every Student Needs and You Probably Don’t Have Time to Teach
by National Hall of Fame Teacher Alan Haskvitz

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alan_Haskvitz

After 40 years of teaching there comes a time when you want to just yell at the curriculum designers and textbook publishers that they have the cart before the horse. Teachers need to be allowed to spend more time teaching students how to learn and less on preparing for a test which measures nothing applicable in the real world.

Correct me if I am wrong, but I feel that every teacher would love to really teach students how to get ready for the challenges ahead of them and use the curriculum as a stepping stone to that goal. Over the years my students always were at the top in the State in terms of standardized testing. Indeed, some of them had perfect scores. The problem was I was teaching them how to take the test. Fortunately, I as able to shorten the material required for the course by removing those elements I though were essentially chaff so that I could teach them essential skills. Essentially, I started by teaching them how to discipline themselves. This worked so well that I still get letters from students, some decades after they were in my class, thanking me for teaching them for life. I have never gotten a letter thanking me for teaching them the Monroe Doctrine.

Here is the list and it far from complete, which are skills that need to be taught. Feel free to comment and add your own.

Learning how to Learn

Developing a love for learning is essential for any educator. It is the most important lesson a teacher can impart to a student and it is also the most difficult. A teacher may have to face a variety of hindrances from lack of parental care, nutritional and emotional problems, and even severe mental concerns. Regardless, there needs to be an effort and the best way is to become a facilitator by prodding, motivating, and providing a diverse array of learning materials to challenge the student to learn for themselves. Most often the textbook, frequently filled with data with little relevance to the student, is the main focus of instruction. And, perhaps, that is the way it must be if the goal is a test that measures improvement in the acquisition of this data. The teacher can feel confident as he or she has covered the material by sticking to the textbook. Motivational, hardly, but that is how teachers are frequently judged. There is another way to do this, but it is time consuming and requires a multitude of rubrics. Providing a variety of materials and having the students learn from them is an arduous task. However, once it is done a teacher can spend the rest of years modifying, adding, and individualizing lessons to meet the needs of the students. ReachEveryChild (cited below) provides a variety of sources for this free material and is an excellent place to start individualization.

The second part of learning how to learn based on whether the student is an auditory, visual or kinetic learner and how to use these to their advantage. It is impossible for a teacher to use all of these methods when presenting lessons, but a student can create their own lessons to help them acquire the knowledge. In my classes I have students create poems, songs, graphic organizers and the Cornell note taking system. In this way there is a variety of methods for them to learn. I insist they use my linking and three transfer method of learning as well. The linking method makes them link what they are learning to other things they have learned and create a “learning tree” of it that they add to throughout the year. The three transfer method is to have students read the material, take notes on it, and transfer that material to another mode such as notecards. I also recommend presenting the answer to a question and have them supply the question. This is an excellent test of finding out what they know. It can be used in all subjects.

What is Valid

If you have time, giving the student a variety of short articles to read and asking them to figure out what would be the best way to judge this material is very worthwhile. This process should also include a study of the various types of propaganda, how to evaluate a website for bias, and stereotyping. That is a lot to swallow and so it is best as part of a school-year long program. If you are teaching social studies an ideal unit could be the differences of opinion between the South and the North about slavery. Learning how to learn is not just about the acquisition of skills, but for the student to acquire the ability to judge the material. One of the best tools to get students to read is Sherlock Holmes and the Sign of Four. As the students read the article they keep track of the characters and reach various conclusions as the teacher hands them the next page. The lesson makes them detectives, but more importantly allows them to learn for life. Seldom are we giving all the answers, but we must make decisions by what we know and judge what is valid.

Speed Reading, not just reading.

It isn’t any secret that the first basic skill is reading. But not just reading, but speed reading. Close reading will follow much more quickly if students can learn how to read rapidly. Reading for facts and reading for pleasure can both be more enjoyable if a student acquires the ability to focus on several words at one time. I taught second graders how to read over a 1000 words per minute at their grade level. The usual improvement was always 200 to 400 words per minute more and this was for language arts and social studies materials. Interestingly the comprehension improves as the speed level doubles as the student concentrates on the material. It is a win-win, but it most be reinforced until it becomes a habit and it takes at least 30 days for it to become a habit. Be warned that some students are resistant to it and so online speed reading sites can help them challenge themselves at their own rate.

Write at Grade Level +

The first thing on teaching a student to write is to explain the types of writing based on the purpose. Taking notes while on the phone or writing a compare and contrast essay may be different in length, but the ingredients are the same. However, for longer works you need to teach the student to write at grade level. I have the students write a one page paper on their favorite vacation either real or imagined. Next, I have them underline all the one syllable words. After that they circle any word that they have not known since primary school. The Fry Formula is applied and the students record their writing scores. They is always silence as the students realize that they are writing at several grades below grade level. Now, that isn’t necessarily bad, but it does force them to expand their vocabulary and that is good. I always have a few Thesaurus books on hand and show them how to use them. The results are immediate and the students not only improve their writing, but improve their thinking and organizational skills as well as they strive to improve. My article (citation below) provides an in-depth look at this successful practice that has enabled my students to win numerous writing competitions.

Teach Them to be Journalist

This vital profession is based on training that every student needs. The ability to communicate, to judge facts, and to influence others with their work. There is no other profession that is so vital for students to learn from because it is essentially what they are going to do nearly every day of their life. A good journalist seeks out evidence and judges it. They write using the who, what, when, where, why, and how approach. They use the inverted triangle that helps them organize facts. Finally, it teaches them to be curious and ask questions and, very importantly, take good notes.

Teach Them to be Lawyers

Perhaps, oversimplifying, but lawyers earn them living by researching and providing evidence that their cause is correct. This requires an examination of evidence and organization. This is another valuable trait that can help students of all ages. For example, was George Washington was a good president? Can you prove it? Can you provide evidence that he was not so good? Some may call this critical thinking, but that type of thinking can not really be utilized until a student is able to have a variety of experiences that enable them to make a critical decision. Thus using the basic skills of an attorney in proving a point and providing evidence to that end are skills they are going to need to write essays persuasive and expository essays and in life.

Be Accountable

At the beginning of the school year I ask the students to look around the room and, without naming names, tell me how many other students they would hire to work for them based on the knowledge that they wanted good workers. After that I ask them to write that number down, fold the paper, and place it in a basket. I take out the numbers and place them on the board to come out with an average. In almost every case it is ten percent of the students or less. That means that the others already have a reputation of not being good workers. The reason for this is that many students simply do not hold themselves accountable. Immediate gratification, poor parenting, the need for quick teacher assessment with little assessment of the assessment, all help feed a “who cares” mentality. This results in large scale cheating with little fear of consequence. Research has overwhelming shown that rewards must be intrinsic to be a lasting value. If students are to be held accountable there must be a reward system that works and entices parent buy-in.
People Skills

We aren’t talking about cooperative learning, we are talking about the ability to get along with others regardless of differences. We are talking about good manners, social skills, negotiating skills, and the ability to work together to create a common goal. Skills as basic as how to talk to people on the phone, how to ask permission, or even showing remorse or concern are missing and yet vital for life.

Handling Emergencies
Handling emergencies is also seldom taught at school. Yes, fire drills are held, but what value are they to the student when a fire really occurs elsewhere? My students wrote and had published in the American Fire Journal the problems with school fire drills in the hopes of enlightening others. School administrators essentially ignored it because it wasn’t an area to be tested. Sad, because the issues the students brought up were important. For example, why does the fire extinguisher stay in the room during a fire drill? Why do the students stand up in rows when an explosion could knock them over? Who knows where the dangerous chemicals are? What do the various colored helmets that firemen wear mean? Needless to say, handling emergencies is a vital skill. Why doesn’t every student know CPR? How to stop bleeding? Or to identify a person having a “fit” and knowing how to act? Taking this a step further, how to teach students not to panic and to learn how to identify people should be taught. But, who has the time?

Skills for life

Setting realistic goals, identifying propaganda and bias, budgeting time, operating a computer and touch typing, triage work assignments, handling money and investments, observation skills, where to find information and measure its accuracy, and learning how to listen can all be incorporated in the curriculum. Each of these carry lifelong importance and all can and have been taught within the curriculum if there is time. There are free units of study on almost all of these areas available. The teacher needs to be given the time and flexibility to personalize them for their class.

Before I get off my high horse I must add one more thing and that is for the student to learn how to be happy. My friend Larry Martz, an editor with Newsweek, wrote in his book Making Schools Better, about the small bite principle. This is a simple plan where small strides can result in large gains. An educator who just takes one of these ideas to heart could make a huge difference knowing well that it is at least as significant as anything on a standardized test.

Why Students Cheat
http://www.teachers.net/gazette/NOV08/haskvitz/

Making Schools Better
http://www.publishersweekly.com/978-0-8129-1939-4

Car Rating Site
http://autos.jdpower.com/

Government fuel economy site
http://fueleconomy.gov/

How to Improve Student Writing
http://reacheverychild.com/blog/2014/not-so-secret-formula-improves-writing

Student speed reading lessons
There are others
http://www.backwoodshome.com/articles/stancliffe59.html

Using the Inverted Triangle
http://www.multimedia-journalism.co.uk/node/2097

Tips on How to Use Pinterest
by Alan Haskvitz

for more free resources go to
http://reacheverychild.com/about-the-author

Whether for school or home, these links can assist you in making your site easier to navigate and more interesting to view. If you have not used Pinterest, the links below are an excellent place to start learning about the process. It is also a great place for veteran users to see what is new. One caveat that should be noted is that Pinterest can be addicting and a teacher needs to keep the end in sight when placing pins. It is easy to drift off topic because a site has some interesting materials. Thus I would limit my posting to those that directly relate to the lesson and remove older ones to keep the site clean. However, keep track of the ones you are removing by placing them on your own teacher site for use in coming years. Use that site as a warehouse of inventory to abeyance for future utilization.

A step-by-step guide to starting
http://www.stevespanglerscience.com/blog/education-today/educators-use-pinterest/

Using Pinterest to add zest to lessons is easy and appeals to students who sometimes are turned off by the rigors of textbook. It does not replace the text, but is a way to make the lessons come alive.

The Teacher’s Guide
http://www.edudemic.com/guides/the-teachers-guide-to-pinterest/

A list of teachers by grade level and their sites. A great way to get fresh ideas.
http://blog.pinterest.com/post/58175180377/say-hello-to-teachers-on-pinterest

A Beginners Video Guide to Pinterest in Two Parts

And

30 Ways for Teachers to Use Pinterest
An excellent section on lessons.
http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2013/05/30-ways-teachers-can-use-pinterest.html

16 Additional Uses
http://www.onlineuniversities.com/ways-educators-use-pinterest

Best Times to Pin
http://www.mcngmarketing.com/best-times-pin-pinterest/#.UzhdNlc_TCs

26 Best Pinterest Tools
Includes Pinstamatic
http://www.wchingya.com/2013/02/pinterest-tools-pinning.html

37 Things Teachers Should Know About Pinterest
http://www.technologybitsbytesnibbles.info/archives/6848

NEA’s Take on Pinterest
Lots of links to specific subjects and uses
http://www.nea.org/tools/52865.htm

Classroom Management Tricks

A length list of YouTube videos that provide insight into Pinterest
http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=using+pinterest+in+the+classroom&sm=3

April Grants for Teachers
by Alan Haskvitz

for more free resources go to http://www.reacheverychild.com/
InvenTeam
For high school students.
InvenTeam projects span many fields from assistive devices to environmental technologies and consumer goods. Applicants are encouraged to consider needs of the world’s poorest people (those earning $2/day) when brainstorming invention ideas.
https://LemelsonMIT.slideroom.com

A large link site with rolling deadlines.
Most everything is listed here
http://www.grantsalert.com/grants/all

Target grants
For everything from field trips to early childhood reading to arts.
Well worth exploring.
https://corporate.target.com/corporate-responsibility/grants

Farm to school grants
The purpose of the USDA Farm to School Grant Program is to assist eligible entities in implementing farm to school programs that improve access to local foods in eligible schools.
http://www.fns.usda.gov/farmtoschool/fy-2015-farm-school-grant-program-funds-available

The Optical Society
A variety of grants for service learning and professional development
http://www.osa.org/en-us/membership_education/grants_recognitions_special_services/grants_fellowships/activity_grant/

A large link for larger grants
http://ncfy.acf.hhs.gov/funding

Unsung hero grants
http://ing.us/about-ing/responsibility/childrens-education/ing-unsung-heroes

Grants for teachers or teams of teachers
http://mccartheydressman.org/2014/01/15/deadline-for-20142015-funding-is-april-15-10000-grants-and-6000-scholarships-available/

Healthy Family grants
This is a large link site and even though some entries have past their deadlines it does not mean that the 2014 ones are not coming online.
http://www.sparkpe.org/grants/grantoftheweek/

 9-11 Lessons and Links: 10th Anniversary Ideas

 by Alan Haskvitz

Voted 100 Most Important Educators in the World

for more resources go tohttp://www.reacheverychild.com

 From Time Magazine:

What my students did on 9/11

http://www.time.com/time/2003/kids/crisis.html

 9/11 Commemorations and Information

Get information about memorials, exhibits, and other means of remembering those who were killed or injured on September 11, 2001.

http://www.usa.gov/Citizen/Topics/History_American/September11.shtml

Videos about 9/11

http://www.watchknowlearn.org/SearchResults.aspx?SearchText=9/11

Teaching about Patriotism

http://www.reacheverychild.com/feature/patriotic.html

 A large link site with lessons and more

http://www.textweek.com/anniversary.htm

 4Action

A free teaching booklet

https://sites.google.com/site/the4actioninitiative/

 The best sites to teach about 9/11

http://larryferlazzo.edublogs.org/2008/08/13/the-best-sites-to-help-teach-about-911/

 9/11 Memorial Site

Photos and information

http://www.911memorial.org/

 Lessons about terrorism

These are on terrorism.

http://www.educationworld.com/a_lesson/lesson244.shtml

 Links and a poem

http://www.vickiblackwell.com/sept11.html

The Seven Habits of Highly Ineffective Terrorits

For older students

http://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2008/10/the_seven_habit.html

Time Magazine Photos

http://www.life.com/gallery/59971/911-the-25-most-powerful-photos?xid=newsletter#index/0

Teachers and Classroom Discipline

by Alan Haskvitz

National Teachers Hall of Fame

Classroom discipline if probably the most difficult thing for a teacher to master. However, although it may be tiresome there are a few rules that might provide help. First, don’t be a buddy. Secondly, contact the parents frequently for all reasons, good and bad. Third, talk with other teachers about your concerns. It is not a sign of weakness to ask for ideas. Fourth, avoid putting a student or yourself in a corner. Finally, don’t be afraid to ask administration for help. This all sounds so easy, but it never is and there are many times when you go home and can’t leave your work at school. I suggest you check out the stress sites below as well as keep a diary of what happens each day at school, good or not so good. At the end of the school year take a look at what you have written. It may reveal some insights into what worked and what didn’t but more importantly it might just reveal that you may have let a few bad days nullify a lot of bright ones.

Here are some good resources that provide a lot of valuable ideas.

Stress sites

http://www.reacheverychild.com/feature/teacher_stress.html

New Teacher Help

http://www.reacheverychild.com/newteach/index.html

Resources for teachers in all areas

http://www.reacheverychild.com/feature/new_resources_for_teach.html

Horace Mann offers valuable services in case of an assault

http://horacemann.com/html/disability/darp.html

What is your classroom management style?

Take the test.

http://education.indiana.edu/cas/tt/v1i2/what.html

How to use your time between classes and in the classroom to help control problems.

http://www.foothill.net/~moorek/transitions.html

Set limits

How to use your voice and body to control classes.

http://www.foothill.net/~moorek/limitsetting.html

Teaching responsibility

http://www.foothill.net/~moorek/responsibilitytraining.html

Dr. Mac’s site

You must go here and see the oodles of ideas,

http://www.behavioradvisor.com/

Over 400 links to behavior and class management sites

http://drwilliampmartin.tripod.com/classm.html

How to make rules

http://ss.uno.edu/ss/New/CMRules.html

Dealing with the student who does not care

http://www.foothill.net/~moorek/omissiontraining.html

An excellent review of the literature. Check out the summary and what works and does not work.

http://www.nwrel.org/scpd/sirs/5/cu9.html

Controlling escalating behavior problems and possible interventions

http://www.foothill.net/~moorek/escalating.html

Avoiding verbal confrontations

http://www.foothill.net/~moorek/backtalk.html

Some good insights from a young teacher including grading ideas.

http://www.middleweb.com/INCASEdiscsteps.html

Ways to check your program and see if it is working

http://www.foothill.net/~moorek/managementsystems.html

You can handle them all

A terrific site with over 100 potential behavior problems and ides on how to handle them.

http://www.disciplinehelp.com/

Example of letter sent home at start of year.

http://www.ueatexas.com/Links/Classroom_Help/Letter_to_Parents_Regarding_Discipline/H_Letter_to_Parents_Regarding_Discipline.html

A nice compilation of information from setting up the classroom to meeting with parents.
http://www.pacificnet.net/~mandel/ClassroomManagement.html

Importance of time on task

http://www.foothill.net/~moorek/timeontask.html


School safety links

http://ss.uno.edu/ss/homepages/SchlSafe.html

Advise from veteran teachers.

No holds barred here.

http://www.middleweb.com/INCASEDiscpl.html

Huge array of classroom management links

http://www.educationworld.com/a_curr/archives/classmanagement.shtml

Ideas about bathroom breaks

http://www.teachnet.com/how-to/manage/cantwait011399.html

Talking about sex in a non-health classroom

http://education.indiana.edu/cas/tt/v1i3/dealing.html

Class rules

Examples for each grade level.

http://www.gigglepotz.com/expectations.htm

Ten activities for creating classroom rules

http://www.education-world.com/a_lesson/lesson274.shtml

Information on bullying

http://members.aol.com/kthynoll/schools.htm

Large selection about dealing with bullying

http://www.reacheverychild.com/feature/bullying.html

Positive Reinforcement site

Has examples and a quiz.

http://psych.athabascau.ca/html/prtut/reinpair.htm

Rules for working with Paraeducators

http://para.unl.edu/para/Behavior/lesson2.html

Teachers’ organization provides information on behavior and when to contact an attorney.

http://www.ueatexas.com/Links/Classroom_Help/Links_Classroom_help.html

How to document student behavior

http://www.foothill.net/~moorek/documentingbehavior.html

Tattletales

http://www.teachnet.com/how-to/manage/tattling100600.html

Management problems for children with special traits such as ADD

http://www.healthyplace.com/Communities/parenting/elaine/mgt.html

Classroom adjustments for special education

http://www.ldonline.org/ld_indepth/teaching_techniques/class_manage.html

Working with shy students

http://www.ericfacility.net/ericdigests/ed402070.html

Frequently asked questions

http://www.cortland.edu/flteach/FAQ/FAQ-Discipline.html

Classroom Management and Discipline Sites

http://www.reacheverychild.com/feature/discipline.html

Classroom Discipline Help

http://www.reacheverychild.com/newteach/index.html

Tips for new teachers

http://www.reacheverychild.com/feature/new_resources_for_teach.html

Student discipline and the new teacher

An interesting article about the frustrations of teaching, especially without a good preparation program.

http://www.middleweb.com/INCASEDiscpl.html

General articles from teachers

Teachers are always the best sources for information on student discipline.

http://studentdiscipline.suite101.com/

American Federation of Teachers

Suggestions and tips

http://www.aft.org/topics/discipline/tips.pdf

Teacher to teacher suggestions

http://studentdiscipline.suite101.com/

Short slide show on essence of student discipline

http://www.slideshare.net/LATTC/student-discipline-1873546

Suggested Reading List

Good start for setting up a program

http://teacherpathfinder.org/Support/discipline.html

Research on Discipline

http://www.nwrel.org/archive/sirs/5/cu9.html

Simplified explanation of needed steps to follow

http://schoolwidediscipline.com/

Guide to School Discipline

http://www.mathguide.com/services/Discipline/

An example of a school district code

http://teched.vt.edu/VCTTE/VCTTEMonographs/VCTTEMono2(Discipline).html

From Canada: A Zero Tolerance Program

http://www.safehealthyschools.org/whatsnew/capzerotolerance.htm

Washington State Booklet for Parents

http://www.governor.wa.gov/oeo/publications/manual_discipline_public_schools.pdf

Excellent collection of teacher ideas and articles

http://www.theteachersguide.com/ClassManagement.htm

Although music has an impact on the mind there is little evidence in improves students success overall. However, it certainly does indicate the music does have some benefits in certain situations. Take your pick of the research and go your own study. In the meantime, here are some great sites that not only have music, but show students how it is created and even how to play certain instruments.

Best music link site

Everything here from sing-along songs to camp fire songs, to composing your own. Four pages of links.

http://www.reacheverychild.com/arts/music/index.html

 

Music for teaching

http://www.reacheverychild.com/feature/music.html

 

Music, instruments, and more

http://www.reacheverychild.com/music.html

Creating Music

Great site where students can learn about most aspects of music, play games and create their own pieces.
http://www.creatingmusic.com/

Sing-Along Songs

Lost of lyrics in alphabetical order.

http://kids.niehs.nih.gov/music.htm

Free kids music in alphabetical order

You can play these songs for your class.

http://freekidsmusic.com/

This site has both songs and lyrics from the PBS Store.

All free.

http://pbskids.org/music/

A great site for older students. It has folk music instruments, composers from the past, and even games. If you are in the Cincinnati area you can even have your own radio show.

http://www.classicsforkids.com/

Research about music in the classroom

A survey article on positive effects of music

http://www.childrensmusicworkshop.com/advocacy/studentdevelopment.html

Harvard Study with mixed results

http://www.gse.harvard.edu/news/features/affirmingmozart09202000.html

Article saying it helps students in reading

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/03/090316075843.htm

 

 

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