buick


Using vehicles to create student interest in math and Language Arts
by National Hall of Fame Teacher Alan Haskvitz
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alan_Haskvitz

Using vehicles is an excellent way to motivate students and to help ready them for real life buying decisions. The following links deal with the various manufactures where students can write for information, obtain pricing information and to harvest compare and contrast data for Common Core related essays.

A listing of all DMV offices.
Finding the office that deals with your state and others can provide information on how old one needs to be to drive as well as the various license fee data that could be used for Common Core math problems. I have used driver manuals to motivate students to read.
http://www.dmv.org/

Data on fuel economy
This federal site would enable students to select a variety of vehicles and there fuel mileage. This could be used for math as well as to provide statistics for an essay on the best or worst type of vehicles in terms of fuel costs.
http://www.fueleconomy.gov/

A link site to manufacturers who sell cars in America
http://search.ezilon.com/united_states/business/automotive/auto_manufacturers/

A listing of vehicle websites worldwide
http://autopedia.com/html/MfgSites.html

National Motorists Association
A great source of information on driving and the law.
http://www.motorists.org/

A listing of car value prices
A good place to find statistics for math problems about the prices of cars and motorcycles.
http://www.nadaguides.com/

Where cars are made by location
Great way to teach geography.
http://www.caranddriver.com/features/a-graphic-representation-of-whats-really-made-in-america-feature

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2015 Buick LaCrosse: A Family Flagship
by The Car Family

A 303 horsepower Buick? Yep, and the Buick LaCrosse also comes adorned with a comforting interior, relaxing ride, an abundance of electronics and a fuel consumption average over 24 mpg. You can stretch that gallon of petrol even more by ordering the Buick LaCrosse e Assist with a 25/36 mpg rating thanks to electric motors. What is most remarkable about this Buick is how far it has come from its roots as one of the nation’s oldest manufacturers famous for fender portholes and innovations such as
turn signals.

General Motors has loaded this flagship of the Buick line with a plethora of options including all wheel drive, a rearview camera, heated and ventilated front seats, 20-inch wheels, navigation system, heads-up display, and the valuable blind-spot, lane-departure and forward-collision warning systems. Our well featured test model listed for $45,000 (US) highlighted by the Driver Confidence Package, an absolute must as it has an abundance of safety features such as cross traffic alerts. This packages works well with the backup camera to provide the driver with another set of eyes when reversing out of tight spots.

The LaCrosse’s appearance has been smoothed and does not look like earlier generations. Indeed, without the Buick badge the LaCrosse could easily be mistaken for an upscale foreign sedan. Of course, it does not have the sporty handling as it is geared for those who enjoy a quiet and comfortable ride surrounded by an attractive interior with spacious seating and enough spunk to make passing and freeway merging less worrisome. With passenger comfort and safety being the primary emphasis of the LaCrosse the cost is a less spacious trunk.

Equipped with option all-wheel drive, this would be a fine choice for those who drive in inclement weather or just want to enjoy the security such a feature provides. The dual-zone automatic climate control and remote start make weather extremes easier to face with OnStar personal service at the ready. An excellent all around sedan for both city and country driving, but more importantly the LaCrosse presents buyers a real choice for those who might be drawn to foreign luxury vehicles and presents a viable American alternative. Safety wise the Buick has good crash scores and airbags everywhere, as well as traction control and electronic stability to lend an electronic hand when needed.

Mom’s view: There is little doubt that the designers of the LaCrosse have done their homework to make this a most livable five seater. There are sound deadeners, acoustical laminate on the windshield and Buick’s QuietTuning to keep the outside world at bay. Even the heavy winds are neutralized by its smooth skin. This is a very elegant car with no edges to ruffle the ride of the occupants. Entry and exit are simple and driving the LaCrosse is as close to sitting in your family room as it gets. The steering is very light and the brakes quick to react. This is a fairly large car and it feels that way providing a sense of security. Overall, a daring reach for Buick that should appeal to those willing to accept the styling changes of a new era.
buickft

Young working man’s view: The eight inch touch screen, Bluetooth, OnStar with Wi-Fi and
4G LTE, make this an unusual vehicle as it brings the LaCrosse into the electronic era in dramatic fashion. Indeed, the system may be overwhelming at first, so I highly recommend spending time with the salesperson for a full explanation. You can get an optional 11-speaker Bose surround-sound audio and even a head-up display, push-button start and a myriad of buttons, knobs and voice commands to explore. There are four trim levels so do your homework as each offers just a little bit more to the mix. Buick’s Intellilink electronics work fairly quickly, but entering data into the GPS takes time to master. The LaCrosse option packages are like eating at an upscale restaurant where there is something special for every taste, but I am more a fast food guy.

Working woman’s view: You can order some intriguing options on this Buick including articulating HID headlamps and some surprising stock items such as grill shutters that close at speed to help with the car’s aerodynamics. The seats are comfortable with the driver getting an eight-way power feature, but the weakness is the lack of storage spaces and that includes the trunk. I like the ride and handling of the all-wheel drive model. I found entry and exit easy, but the most intriguing aspect was how quiet it was on the road. A four hour ride left all of us feeling relaxed going over some fairly steep mountain passes, but I would opt for the e-Assist model for the additional fuel savings.

Dad’s view: The six speed transmission, as all General Motors’ automatics, works seamlessly and Buick even offers a Sport mode to hold the car in a lower gear longer. Very unBuick like. Selecting the Sport mode also impacts the steering and throttle response and is perfect when additional acceleration is needed for passing. This Buick should appeal to those with a yen for a larger sedan that provides an old-fashioned sense of value as well as a history of proven reliability.
buickint

Family conference: Buick has earned attention for earning top spots on numerous quality studies over competing brands. The LaCrosse’s modern styling and relaxed fit driving style provide an excellent reason to test drive one. However, make sure you get a good tutorial before you drive off as some of the most intriguing functions are the numerous electronic offerings.

For more reviews check out http://www.motorists.org/carfamily/

Best 2013 SUVs for Gas Mileage

by The Car Family

For more reviews go to http://www.motorists.org/carfamily/

 First, SUVs by their nature are not fuel frugal. They are heavy and have a significant wind drag. Some manufacturers have even gone so far as to put larger gas tanks in them to provide the illusion that you are getting better mileage because the fuel gauge is slower to move. However, fuel weighs 8.6 pounds per gallon and thus the added weight diminishes mileage as well.

 Furthermore, SUVs are not as safe as minivans in most cases due to their height. Indeed SUVs are involved in more single vehicle accidents. That being said, If you really need a SUV there are some that get reasonable mileage.

 Our strongest recommendation is for what is called a crossover, which means it was built on a passenger car frame. Next, unless you travel frequently in inclement weather, two wheel drive provides better mileage and less maintenance. If you may need to carry six or eight passengers the three row SUVs are obviously your choice, but take the time to see how difficult it is to get into that third row.

 Combining price, mileage and family friendlessness we have come up with our top 15. This is the list of the best SUVs under $50,000 and almost all of them run on regular fuel.

 BMW X1 is a good handling, handy sized SUV that gets 24 mpg city / 33 mpg hwy and has a MSRP of $30,650. If it fits, a best buy for those who want a bit of fun in their daily treks.

 The Buick Encore is a good value, with lots of standard features, this Buick is a quiet ride, very sedate, and offers a rating of 25 mpg city / 33 mpg hwy for a MSRP: $25,010.

The Chevrolet Equinox/ GMC Terrain have excellent cargo space and a host of available safety features. Plenty of poke for a MSRP: $25,800 and 22 mpg city / 32 mpg hwy.

Redone for 2013, the Escape is listed with a MSRP: $22,470 and rated at 22 mpg city / 31 mpg hwy. Ford does not allow us to tests it vehicles so we can’t offer insights into its family usefulness. For the same money or less you can get a none hybrid SUV with better fuel figures.

Basically the same as last year, the 21 mpg city /30 mpg hwy rated Ford Edge is listed at a MSRP: $34,940 and is closely related to the Lincoln MKX. Again, Ford does not allow us to test its vehicles so we can’t offer any opinion. The pricing puts it in the near luxury category. Check Ford’s reliability record first.

The 2013 Honda CR-V has a MSRP: $24,795 and its four-cylinder engine yields a 23 mpg city / 31 mpg hwy average. Sadly, Honda, as Ford, does not allow us to test its products and so we can’t comment on this SUVs usefulness. However, in the past it has been a good value. We do know that the Toyota RAV has been redone and gets the same or better fuel mileage at a slightely lower suggested price.

 We love Hyundai vehicles for their value, warranty, and features and the Tucson is no exception. There are well thought out design ideas everywhere and the base price is $20,245. Be warned that you must come to the dealer having done your homework because there are several models and numerous features. Gas mileage ratings of 22 mpg city/29 mpg hwy

The 2013 Kia Sorento is being built in the USA and is a big seller. Why? Lots of interior room, features, and a MSRP: $26,950 are some, but the 21 mpg city / 30 mpg hwy is just as important.

 Kia’s Sportage has a list price under $20,000 and a 20 mpg city / 27 mpg hwy rating. If you order the turbocharged engine expect less.

Here is a winner with a starting price in the low $20,000 range and the Mazda CX-5 compact crossover segment is rated between 31 – 35 mpg, bettering the hybrids. Lots of options so do your homework and don’t expect V8 performance or towing capability.

 We like the well priced Mitsubishi Outlander Sport with its 25 mpg city / 31 mpg hwy averages and a base price in the law $20,000s. This is an outstanding handling SUV and should be on your consideration list if there is a dealer in your area. Surprisingly nimble.

 Ford’s Escape Hybrid used to be among our favorites, but it is has a totally different feel and pricing from $30,570. For that you get a top ten fuel efficient SUV with a city average of up to 34 mpg and a highway rating about 31. There are a lot of non-hybrids that get have the same mileage rating and have a lower starting price. The Escape is bigger in every way.

 Lexus RX 450 is expensive, but worth it with high resale, excellent reliability and a tremendous number of luxury features for the $46,310 to $47,710 listed price. You can achieve about 32 mpg in the city and 28 on the highway. Easily the best luxury SUV for gas mileage, features, and user ratings. If you want something less costly and with fewere fringes try the Toyota Highland Hybrid with an overall 28 mpg rating and a price range that starts around $39,000. Both of these SUVs come with less expensive non-hybrid versions that average about 22 mpg.

The Mini Countryman isn’t really a SUV in the traditional sense. It is smaller, lighter on its feed, and a lot more fun to drive and park. Prices range from $20,000 to $34,850 and you can easily achieve 30 mpg and more if you can restrain yourself. Yes, all wheel drive is available.
The Nissan Juke is a sporty crossover that looks a bit strange, but that is its charm. As well as a 29 mpg average and a starting price just under $20,000. Very fun to drive and no slouch in terms of performance.

Mazda’s CX-5 lists from $20,995 to $28,595 and you can average 30 mpg in mixed driving without much effort. A good handling machine, as are most Mazdas, this Mazda costs less, handles better and gets superior gas mileage to the Ford Escape hybrid. It does not have the same cargo space. If you are serious about gas mileage, this is the one.

Don’t underestimate the Mitsubishi Outlander Sport and its that can get around 27 mpg in mixed driving. This SUV is both fuel efficient, enjoyable to drive, and a bargain with a starting price under $19,000. Great deals abound.

Also among the most efficient SUVs and another bargain, the Hyundai Tucson with its base engine and starting price of just over $19,000 can get you government gas mileage ratings of 23 City/31 Hwy. A tough crossover, this Hyundai has an excellent warranty and has plenty of features.

Subaru XV Crosstrek lists for $21,995–$24,495 and offers all wheel drive while still getting government ratings of 23 to 33 in city and highway driving. If you want more room and have a can spend a little more money try the Subaru Outback with a combined 26 mpg.

Toyota RAV4 24 miles per gallon city, and 31 mpg on the highway cycle with front-wheel-drive models and a starting price about $24,000. This is an all new vehicle and it is undercuts the Honda CR-V on pricing and beats it on gas mileage. If you don’t test these two back to back you are making a big mistake if you are in the market for a name brand crossover.

There you have it. Our recommendations are simple. The Chevrolet offers the best fuel mileage and interior room for the price. The Mazda products are fun and get excellent gas mileage, and the Lexus RX 450 is the Queen of this list. As for the new BMW X1, it could be your best bet if you watch your options and don’t need the interior space of the larger vehicles on this list. If you need all wheel drive the Subarus are a great choice.

For a list of all vehicle websites go to http://reacheverychild.com/business/index.html

Notable 2013 Cars

With an improving economy and the desire for many to own more fuel efficient vehicles a schism is between the practical and the look at me crowd is emerging. The result is more sophistication and a more difficult choice for buyers. It is no longer simple to buy a vehicle of your dreams without doing significant research. That is why sites such as this are so valuable in helping you winnow out the wheat from the chaff. Here are some of the most significant new cars at this point.

Acura ILX

The ILX is a more refined Honda Civic with upgrades nearly everywhere from the suspension to the interior to the engine. You can also get it as a hybrid or a hot rod version with 201-hp, 2.4-liter four-cylinder engine with a six-speed manual. Look for prices to go into the mid $30,000 range and start ten grand less.

Acura RDX

Small families in a hurry will like the RDX with a 3.5-liter V-6 creating 273 hp that uses a six-speed automatic. There is an available all-wheel-drive system. Priced between $35,000 and $41,000.

Acura RLX

For around $50,000 you can own all all new RLX that come with front wheel drive or as a hybrid with all drive. Lots of technology and fairly good fuel mileage as well. Pricing will most likely be around $50,000.

Audi Allroad

Audi Q5

Back again and this time a bit tame compared to the previous version. A tough looking little wagon with a turbocharged four cylinder engine. Figure $40,000, but not nearly as rugged as its older brother.

Audi RS5
The RS5 coupe has a V8 that makes 450 hp and is mated to a even-speed transmission and all wheel drive. This slippery two door is going to make friends quickly with the highway patrol as the rear spoiler deploys automatically at 75 mph. Perhaps a performance bargain at $80,000 or so.

Audi S6
Now with a twin-turbo V-8, eight-speed automatic transmission and a plethora of high end goodies, this Audi combines both performance and luxury.

Audi S7

Similar in nearly every way to the S6, except it costs more and is a hatchback.

Audi S8
The S8 is a big, fast sedan with power from a twin-turbo V-8 trumps and an abundance of technology and performance features. Oh, this 520 horsepower version is going to cost you well over $100,000.

Bentley Continental GT V8

We thought the GT was a bargain at $150,000 when it came out ten years ago. It now $177,000 and up, and you are reduced to just eight cylinders. Oh, you still have 500 horsepower and are driving one of the world’s most expensive gas hogs.
BMW 640i Gran Coupe

It is all about looks with this sort of new model with previous mechanics and a sculptured four door design. If you like it and have close to $80,000 you won’t have to worry about some of the impractical elements such as a small trunk and reduced visibility, You also need to control your impulses when deciding on options. but you are going to be seem in one of the all time family friendly babe magnets.
BMW M6
Seriously expense with a turbocharged V-8 places 560 hp at your disposal. For about $107,000 this is a very fast machine that handles well. Best advise, pay an extra seven grand and get the convertible. Rich speed demons will love it.

BMW X1

BMW X1

A small SUV with the BMW character for those with over $30,000, this model looks a lot like its sister, the X3 with the same engines, all wheel drive availability, the availability of a M Sports package. A plethora of options, but most important was the fact that this just might be the most useful and “inexpensive” BMW you can buy.

Buick Encore

A small Buck, who would have thought. Nevertheless, GMC is on a roll and this is one luxury placed small car, but far from tiny. The 1.4-liter turbo four-cylinder has plenty of pep and the interior r is very upscale, Look for pricing I the $20,000 plus range. Going to be interesting to see if this model brings the younger fold to the dance.

Buick Verano Turbo

The news this year is the turbo and, honest, you can order this Buick with a manual transmission. Add the usual Buick reliability and interior treatments and you have a fun, fast, family vehicle for about $30,000.
Cadillac ATS

The American BMW, this line of Cadillacs has a vast array of options from turbocharged four and six cylinders power plants to a manual transmission to all wheel drive and sophisticated suspensions. Starting prices around $34,000.
Cadillac XTS

This bigger cad is big and filled with luxury features as those of olden days. A 300 hp plus engine makes it a highway cruiser. With options the $45,000 price sprints to nearly $60,000 for this front wheel drive model. The Cue system takes voice cues and runs the information and entertainment controls. Huge touch screen. A lot of car for the money.

Chevrolet Corvette 427 convertible

Convertible, that is all you need to know. Over 500 horsepower and the wind in your hair for $77.000 or so.

2013-Chevrolet-Corvette-427-054-medium

Chevrolet Impala
A fresh face, underpinnings, and a 2.5-liter engine, a 2.4-liter hybrid and a 3.6-liter V-6 with 303 hp to keep face with the competition. Priced well under $30,000. Much more youthful looking then Ford. I family oriented winner.

Chevrolet Malibu

A couple of engine options including a form of hybrid for his well priced and equipped model.
Don’t pay more for the competition until you check it out. Prices starting around $22,000.

Chevrolet Sonic RS

A sporty compact, this sleek model has upgraded appearance and suspension and brakes. . The turbo engine creates excitement and at $20,100 it does that.

Chevrolet Spark
This is a price leader with great fuel mileage and room for four adults. Prices too low to mention here. Just kidding. About $13,000.

Dodge Dart
Built on a sporty Alfa Romeo platform and sharp looking, the Dart is a a low priced, well finished car that should draw people back to the dealerships who are looking for value and looks. Starts under $17,000.

Fiat 500L

Bigger may be better. We love the Fiat for what it is, fun-to-drive and cute. The new version is bigger and more expensive. If you need four doors this Fiat may be just right.

Ford C-Max
The C-Max hybrid can be ordered as a standard hybrid or a plug-in. We tend to wait a while before buying new vehicles laden with technology.

Ford Escape

Ditto, the Escape is all new in design and look for prices to be higher as well. A lot of competition in this segment and the trick rear hatch that opens by detecting your foot passing under the rear part of the vehicle is interesting, but what about just hitting the remote keyfob?

Ford Fusion

Well, it sure looks different and comes with a variety of power train configurations. Look for competitive pricing, but check out Ford’s quality ratings first. The are now 23rd, according to J.D. Powers.

GMC Terrain Denali

More is the operative word here. More safety features, comfort and good fuel economy with the base engine. If you must have a SUV, this one is highly recommended with great fuel economy and interior room. Priced in the mid $20,000 range for the base version.

Honda Accord
Honda does not let us test their vehicles. As such all we can say is that there is a lot of competition in this category and we highly recommend you drive them all before making a decision. Do your homework first, because there are a lot of options. As for hybrids, Honda has lagged behind Toyota in this regard for years after getting a headstart with its terrific, but small, Insight. If you are considering this type of power train take the time to see the price of replacement battery packs, too. We can recommend three Honda models based on past experience. First, the expensive Odyssey van. Next the CRV crossover. Finally, the Fit with the latter being the best value overall.
Hyundai Elantra GT

Elantra GT

Elantra GT

An exceptional combination of sporty, fuel frugal, and family friendly features makes this bargain priced Hyundai a great choice for those on a budget or who just like to have fun. Prices under $19,000 to start. Remember, if you don’t want the sporty model the base Elantra is a winner, too. Hyundai is clearly providing good looking vehicles with superior gas mileage and warranty. If you have a dealership near check out the line.

Hyundai Santa Fe

With room for seven in some versions, the Hyundai is loaded with features and priced right starting at $23,000. Expect gas mileage to be in the low 20 mpg range. The Sport model has two rows of seats. If you choice to go with front wheel drive and the smaller engine your mileage could easily be 30 percent better.

Hyundai Veloster Turbo

Looks and features are the reason for the Veloster. Good fuel economy, reasonable performance and interesting options for about $23,000.

Infiniti JX35

A three row SUV, this well equipped luxury model is an extensive list of safety items and enough goodies to entertain the family as well. Prices start at $41,000.

Lexus ES
The bread and butter car of the Lexus line-up along with the RX, the new ES is longer and better and improved in every regard. Excellent fuel mileage and performance make this a dominate player in this market segment. Also available as a hybrid and you can average nearly 40 mpg in mixed driving with this option.

Lincoln MKZ

Interesting looking and using a variety of engine combinations that are shared with the Ford Fusion, the MKZ can be ordered with all wheel drive and as a hybrid. Prices around $36,000. A direct competitor to the Lexus ES so check resale values, too.

Mazda CX-5

Mazda5

A tremendous value in base form, this SUVish hauler gets a class leading 25 to 31 mpg and plenty of technology and standard features. There isn’t much downside on this model, and it even is available with all wheel drive. Prices start in the low $20,000 range, but don’t expect luxury, expect a useful people mover that will probably be invisible to the highway patrol.

Mercedes-Benz GL
The GL can be order with a Bluetec’s turbo-diesel, a V-6 a V8, a 4.7-liter turbo, or an AMG 5.5-liter twin turbo V-8 so be prepared to spend some time test driving a variety before buying. The new model can hold seven passengers. Prices start around the mid-$60,000 range and escalate to well over $100,000 depending on your need for speed.

Mercedes-Benz GLK250 Bluetec

It is here, a diesel SUV, and with prices below $40,000 and fuel mileage in the 22 mpg range it might make sense, but be aware the higher diesel fuel costs must be considered in comparison to the premium fuel recommended for gas engined versions.

Mini Paceman

Interesting looks is what this Mini offers. Priced around the mid $20,000 depending on options.

Nissan Altima

Believe it or not this Nissan is catching on with those who like value, performance and features. Only the Toyota Camry sold more in this market segments. It is fun to drive and if you are easy on throttle with the base engine you can easily get 35 mpg. A best value if you are looking for a family car that doesn’t take away driving enjoyment.

Nissan Pathfinder

Now a crossover, the Pathfinder gets better fuel-economy, a better ride, and treats inhabitants better. Priced in the $30,000 area, the model has a lockable all wheel drive option and third row seating. It also has the great Nissan’s Around View monitor that must be seen to be believed. That alone is worth a drive to the Nissan dealership.

Porsche Boxster

All new and sharper looking and more expensive, this Porsche is no longer the poor man’s 911, but now stands alone as a top performing sports car. The S model is the one to have, but the extra horsepower will cost you over $10,000 more. Base price is about $50,000.

Scion FR-S and Subaru BRZ

Scion_FRS

The Scion is less expensive, but both sporty cars are back to basics funmobiles. The reason we compared them together is that they were developed together. In a way, they are the new Mazda Miata with a starting price in the mid $20,000, a long list of extra cost options, and Subaru’s four cylinder, 200-hp boxer engine. As close to a thrill ride is you are going to get for this price and and it has a 25 combined mpg to justify the purchase.

SRT Viper

Priced about $90,000 and with enough horsepower to challenge most anything this side of a drag strip, the modernized Viper is no longer so touchy to drive with electronics to help control the power.

Subaru XV Crosstrek

The XV Crosstrek is a more outdoor friendly Impreza. Cute, gets exceptional gas mileage for an all wheel drive vehicle, and with a starting price around $20,000 well equipped, this crossover might have the right combination to attract more buyers the same way the Outback did for the Legacy.

Tesla Model S

Tesla is a sporty electric motor powered sedan that is sexy and handles well. Driving range between charges depends on speed and the use of other features such as air-conditioning. The best thing about this model is that it is available. A tribute to tenacity. If you have the money this is a car you want to be seen driving.

Toyota Avalon

Bigger, no. Better, yes. This is a far sportier, more fun to drive, and still roomy sedan. Same engine options as the Camry. A great family sedan starting above $30,000 and more eager to please. Passengers will never know it isn’t a Lexus.

Volkswagen Beetle Convertible

_VW_Beetle

Sleeker, but retaining its charm, the new Beetle has the same engines as its hard-top VW sisters. Prices should hoover around the $30,000 range. And wait till you see the option packages that date from previous decades. Cool. You just have to go.

Family conference: Our favorites are the new Audi sedans with diesel powerplants, the BMW X1, Scion FR-S and Subaru BRZ, Buick Encore, and Elantra. We think Buick, Subaru, Nissan, Audi, Toyota, and Kia/Hyundai are on winning streaks.

New for 2011 and Notable

by The Car Family

For more reviews go to http://www.motorists.org/carfamily/home/most-reliable-vehicles/

There are a lot of changes for , but most involve tidying up existing models and a shot of adrenaline here and there to get a tinkle from the buying public. However, there are a few that might create a rash on your credit limit with great fuel mileage, family oriented designs and speed limit challengers.. As always, with The Car Family, we disclose what we own so as not to hide any bias. In the fleet are an Oldsmobile, Saab, Lexus, and Mercedes.

Acura TSX Sport Wagon is a glamourized Honda Accord wagon with a 2.4-liter 204-horsepower 4-cylinder engine. A good choice for the family that doesn’t want the stigma of driving a mini-van.

Aston Martin Cygnet is difficult to portray. It has a very upgraded interior, trademark front and rear treatments, and a smallish engine producing just enough thrust to make it a little fun. Priced in the near luxury range. Sort of cute.

Aston Martin V12 Vantage has a gas hoggish 6.0-liter V12 engine with 510 horsepower and 420 lb-ft of torque, and costs around $120,000. Aston Martin also is offering a four door sedan. The Rapide is expensive, fuel swilling, and beautiful. They won’t let family oriented writers test it so we can’t offer any opinion on its real life virtues.

Audi is on a hot streak. They have a good product and treat the family press fairly meaning that aren’t afraid of you learning the truth. That said, the Audi A7 Sportback is coming and it should redefine the segment. The stunning RS5 is already being sold elsewhere and could be an instant classic. The Audi A8 gets a new look, but for families we much prefer the Q5. We recently tested the A4 and felt it was the equal to the 3 Series BMW, but better looking. Great fuel mileage, too.

Bentley has become arrogant with their dealings with family oriented reviewers. In the past they were bargains, but lately they just added more horsepower, a few tidbits to attract conspicuous consumption crowd. The sedan is family friendly, but the gas mileage isn’t. If you can afford the, payments, insurance and fuel, the sedan is a good used vehicle to consider as they depreciated quickly. The Mulsanne is new and can be yours for $300,000. The Continental GTC Supersports Convertible has 621 horsepower and is very fast. If you have the $300,000 this might be the convertible to own and express your support of the British worker and German owner.

BMW X1 is a small SUV built on the 3-Series platform. s should be in the mid $30,000 range. How different it will be from the X3 remains to be seen, but it could be more nimble and quicker.

BMW ActiveHybrid 7 combines a twin-turbocharged 4.4-liter V8 engine and an electric motor for excellent performance while getting about 20 mpg in a very large car. To save on gas you must first pony up over $100,000

We always liked the Buick Regal. It was comfortable, rode well, and gave us good economy and reliability. It wasn’t fun, but it was ready when you were. Buick has brought back the Regal and gave it some European DNA from its Opel line. The power is probably going to be the 2.4-liter 4-cylinder engine with 184 horsepower and GM’s excellent 6-speed automatic transmission. Note, fans of the lamented Grand Nationals, the the lightweight Regal might make an excellent fit for a turbocharged engine. The base model is probably going to be in the low-$20,000 range.

The CTS Coupe could be the flagship for Cadillac. It looks good and there is no reason to believe that it isn’t going to be available with engines from mild to wild. Prices should start under $40,000.

Far more practical, and if well marketed it could be a surprise hit for Chevrolet, is the Cruze with a price in the mid-teens. Chevrolet is going to plant a 1.8-liter 4-cylinder engine in this price leader with an optional higher output unit available. Look for gas mileage in the 30 mpg range in daily driving.

Chevrolet Camaro Convertible is a reinforced version of the Camaro now on sale. With pricing expected to be in the area of $30,000 this could ignite the pony car war between Ford and Chevrolet again. Power for the Camaro should be the potent 3.6-liter 304-horsepower V6 and the gas 19 mpg, 6.2-liter 426 horsepower V8.

Chevrolet Volt has oozed press for two years so it better be good or else. This extended-range hybrid is said to be capable of going 40 miles on just battery power and uses a small internal combustion engine to recharge the batteries and additional power. Look for tax incentives to help build interest for this $40,000 White Knight.

 Chrysler 200 is the new Sebring, which could be a good thing. The new look sedan would include a variety of powerplants and a sharper image. Engine choices should be fairly conservative with a four cylinder and V6 as the motivators. Prices probably be in the low $20,000 arena.

 Chrysler’s 300 is a big seller and the company has cleaned up the previous models Bentley like stance and snow plow front end with a much sleeker style. The possibility of a V6 with nearly 300 horsepower would make sense, but there is still the Hemi to consider. Look for prices in the mid-$20,000 range.

 

Dodge Charger is slightly tidied up both outside and in with the “Pentastar” 3.6-liter engine the main force. The 5.7-liter HEMI V8 will return with cylinder deactivation technology available. All wheel drive is also offered with prices in the mid-$25,000 ballpark.

 Dodge Durango is an old fashioned big, heavy SUV. Look for a price around $30,000 and a large interior with three rows of seating. Probably not good on fuel and probably not swift with the base 3.6-liter Pentastar V6 engine. If you want to haul order the 5.7-liter HEMI V8 engine.

 Ferrari’s 599 GTO is priced at $460,000 and up. For that you get 6.0-liter V12 front mounted engine driving the rear-wheels with a top speed over 200 mph. You also get a happy car insurance sales person.

We have never liked the crude ride and problematic of the Ford Explorer and we hope this nearly $30,000 new version well erase those images from our mindset with better its fuel economy and sharper handling. Since we think highly of the newish Ford Flex and Edge we know Ford is up to the task. The Explorer is going to be powered by the same engines as the others with a turbocharged 2.0-liter 4-cylinder a possibility.

Ford Fiesta. This is probably the best small car Ford has ever produced. It is youth oriented with colors and interior treatments that appeal to young drivers. A 1.6-liter 4-cylinder engine with 120 horsepower should enable the lightweight Fiesta to earn 38 mpg credentials. Not bad for about $14,000.

Honda CR-Z Hybrid is a sporty coupe with gas mileage figures of 39 mpg. We would have loved this car with just a gas engine, but Honda has brought into this world an interesting alternative. The problem is that the extra weight takes away some of the fun. Still, this is a car for those who love to drive and are frugal. The 1.5-liter 122-horsepower gasoline engine coupled to Honda’s Integrated Motor Assist is enjoyable for $19,000

The Honda Odyssey has been recognized as a superior minivan for years, but it never had the utility of the Dodge and Chrysler vans. This all new version is sporty looking inside and out and the engine has even better gas mileage squeezed out of it. The 3.5-liter V6 engine comes with 248 horsepower and is rated at 28 mpg on the road. That is awesome, considering its size. Look for a base version with a 5-speed automatic to start around $28,000 and the shinier model, with a 6-speed automatic, to push well into the $30,000 range with any sort of options. All new look should draw customers.

The Equus is a truly big gamble from Hyundai as it moves this Korean manufacture into the luxury car segment by offering a $50,000 plus sedan with a potent 385horsepower V8 engine and features aplenty. Is this the right car at the right time remains a question, but there is no question that Hyundai is on a winning streak.

 Hyundai Elantra is a very economical vehicle that has good looks, good gas mileage, and a good warranty. It is probably the biggest sleeper in the under $15,000 segment, and if you want they are even offering a base model for less. The car’s fuel mileage rating of 38 mpg comes from its 1.6-liter 4-cylinder engine that produces 138 horsepower. A well priced commuter car, family car, second car, and go to college car.

The Hyundai Sonata is priced under $20,000 and for that you get one of the better equipped cars in this market segment that is usually dominated by cars from Ford and Japan. The Sonata is sharp looking and its 2.4-liter 4-cylinder engine makes an outstanding 198 horsepower. You can also order a turbocharged 2.0-liter engine or hybrid, but the base engine is our favorite.

 Infiniti IPL G Coupe is a vehicle that frankly surprises us. Not so much its performance, which should be good with a 348 horsepower 3.7-liter V6 engine, a stern suspension and better brakes, but why pay more when the G Coupe is nearly as good in all ways? Anyway, Infiniti is now bringing a performance based niche vehicle to market for about $45,000 and that should appeal to early adopters eager to test the performance of Infiniti’s IPL arm.

 The Infiniti G25 is an attempt by Infiniti to expand its market to those who love the handling and interior appointments of the more expensive G37, but don’t need the extra horsepower or cost. Call it the base Infiniti as it is priced about $30,000. Gas mileage figures to average around 24 mpg on premium fuel for the 2.5-liter V6 with 218 horsepower powerplant.

Well now, Infiniti has redone its powerful M sedan and made it slicker and a bit nasty with an available 3.7-liter V6 engine creating 330 horsepower or a ground pounding 5.6-liter V8 with 420 horsepower. Even with a new 7-speed automatic transmission both versions will be hard pressed to get 20 mpg in mixed driving. Prices should be in the mid-$40,000 range. The luxury car field has never been more compelling.

And there is the Jaguar XJ with its slick exterior and interior and two potent engines to tempt your driver’s license points. The 5.0-liter V8 engine has 385 horsepower and the supercharged version produces about 510 horsepower if you go with the Supersport option. Why not. Priced just south of $70,000.

Jeep Grand Cherokee is a big gamble for Chrysler. This is a core product in its line-up and one that must be good to keep the company from doing Yugo. The interior is sharp, the drivetrain includes a strong 3 .6-liter V6 engine making 290 horsepower, a goodly amount of cargo room, and much improve ergonomics. Everything has been improved including a “Selec-Terrain” feature that allows drivers to choose from five pre-programmed settings depending on road conditions. The optional 5.7-liter V8 ups the towing capacity to 7,400 pounds. Easily the best Grand Cherokee ever and priced around $30,000.

For ten grand less you can order the new Jeep Wrangler with a much improved interior and ride. Everything is better, but the design is still unique so not to disappoint the clientele.

The Kia Optima is a looker, no kidding. This sub-$20,000 sedan is loaded with standard features and comes with two new and interesting powerplants this year. A turbocharged 2.0-liter 4-cylinder and a hybrid option could make Civic owners a little shy.

Kia has also upgraded its Forte by offering a 5-Door. You can order this sharp looking, well under $20,000 bargain with a a 2.0-liter 4-cylinder engine producing 156 horsepower or a 2.4-liter 4-cylinder engine with 176 horsepower and more motor choices are possible.

 Kia’s Compact SUV is the Sportage and this year it sharper all around. The
2.4-liter 176-horsepower 4-cylinder engine is economical and frisky and its priced just over $18,000.

For a couple of grant more you can order the new Kia Sorento with a 2.4-liter 4-cylinder engine or the 276-horsepower 3.5-liter V6.

We loved the Toyota Supra, but the Lexus LFA is no Supra, especially priced at $375,000. Of course, the LFA is other worldly when in comes to Toyota as the car has carbon-fiber bodywork, a V10 engine with 552 horsepower, and you can only lease them.

 Lexus CT 200h is an interesting consideration. The hybrid hatchback uses a 1.8-liter Atkinson-cycle 4-cylinder hybrid engine mated to a continuously variable transmission. Look at it as a sporty Prius. Priced under $30,000.

The Lincoln MKX is a crossover that uses a potent 3.7-liter V6 with 305 horsepower and improved suspension and a plethora of luxury items to entice SUV buyers. Priced just under $40.000.

Lincoln’s MKZ Hybrid is really worthwhile with a staggering fuel mileage estimate of over 40 mpg in town and 36 on the road. The engine is a 2.5-liter 4-cylinder hybrid and is combined with an electric motor to create 191 horsepower. This could easily be the car of the year for about $34,000.

Lotus Elise is the ultimate niche vehicle trying to emerge from that niche. They are offering a wider range of engines, including a supercharged version and there are hints the company might be experimenting with more environmentally friendly versions of this lightweight flyer which would be a good idea because these are not high mpg vehicles despite their size. The SC is the fastest version with 0 to 60 times under five seconds. Of course, handling well be outstanding and a new ABS promises superior braking.

Lotus Evora is new with a 2+2 passenger cabin that offers more room without sacrifising zip. Lotus is planning on bringing out five models this year all great handling, sleek, and fast.

What, an even smaller Mazda? Yep, the Mazda2 is a basic economy car with a 1.5-liter 100-horsepower 4-cylinder engine with fuel economy in the 32 mpg range. Priced under $14,000.

Mercedes-Benz E-Class Cabriolet is a four-seat convertible with a well insulated power soft-top and either a 5.5-liter V8 engine with 382 horsepower or a 3.5-liter V6 with 268 horsepower. Priced under $60,000. Not much completion in this price range for a topless touring car.

Gullwing doors are back and the Mercedes-Benz SLS AMG has them as well as our favorite bad boy engine, the 6.3-liter V8 with its 563 horsepower and 479 lb-ft of torque. If you can afford
$185,000 or so, this might even be looked at as an investment.

 A Big MINI, the Countryman is a sort of cute utility vehicle with all wheel drive and room for five, sort of. Could be a good value, but at $30,000 it might be a rare sight on the road. Engine choices probably the same as the MINI.

Another all electric vehicle is coming in the form of the Mitsubishi i-MiEV. This car has been for sale elsewhere and so should be well proven. It can go 80 mph but that will probably cut down on its expected range between charging of 80 to 100 miles. A long charging time may slow sales of this $30,000 sedan.

 Mitsubishi’s Outlander Sport comes with front-wheel drive or all wheel drive and can be ordered with a continuously variable transmission with paddle shifters. The upscale SE comes with automatic climate control, 18-inch alloy wheels, rain-sensing windshield wipers, heated front seats, cruise control, upgrade stereo, and a keyless entry system. The base engine is a four cylinder making 148 horsepower for about $19,000.

 Nissan Leaf is electric, in case you haven’t heard. The 80 kilowatt electric motor can push this sedan to 90 mph, although the expected range of 100 miles well be diminished. As with all electric passenger vehicles, look for a federal tax credit to help defray the cost and that could be worth $7,500 on the $33,000 early adapter.

Its no Juke, Nissan is bringing to market yet another SUV. This one is smaller and unique in its styling. It rides high, has five doors, and should be rambunctious with a 180-horsepower turbocharged 1.6-liter 4-cylinder engine. Priced under $20,000.

 The Quest minivan from Nissan is going to challenge the Honda Odyssey for looks, attitude, and performance. Look for a sharp exterior, the potent 3.7 V6 engine and power everything. It will probably handle better, but not have as many family friendly features as the Chrysler.

Saab is back, thankfully. This is a great name in the industry and deserves a fresh look. The
9-5 has a chopped like top, and looks very modern. Engines should continue to be the same with a fuel sipping and plenty fast turbocharged four cylinder with 180 horsepower and a 2.8-liter V6 with 300 horsepower. Pricing is just under $50,000. This could be another cult car just as the older 9-3 hatchback and the 2006 anniversary edition convertible.

Scion iQ is a small car that Toyota is bringing to market to do battle with those interested in fuel mileage and basic transportation with a flair. The 1.3-liter 4-cylinder engine is attached to a continuously variable transmission. Look for fuel mileage in the 40 mpg plus range and prices to start well under $14,000.

smart fortwo is adding to its offerings with an all-electric model and a fortwo+2 with a rear seat and four doors. Prices should be under $15,000 and that’s a lot of cute for the money.

 Suzuki Kizashi Sport has a 2.4-liter 4-cylinder engine and a sport-tuned suspension and it is sharp handling. With 185 horsepower and a manual transmission this could be fun for under $24,000

 As always, the Toyota Avalon is simply a Lexus in disguise. It looks sharper now and is more streamlined. The 3.5-liter V6 engine with 268 horsepower is mated to a 6-speed automatic transmission tuned for obedience and not free spirits. Should be priced under $33,000 so not to step on the toes of the Lexus ES 350.

 All new, sort of, the Toyota Sienna looks like the previous version that has gone through a frugal modernization. We like the look and the many trim levels that enables a family to select the model that suits their needs. There is still an all wheel drive option. The base engine is fine if you don’t load it up and head for the mountains as its 2.7-liter 187-horsepower 4-cylinder is stout. The 3.5-liter 266-horsepower V6 is an option. Prices start around $25,000.

 Volkswagen’s Jetta is a bargain at under $17,000. A bit larger, but with the some of the same engine selections as the current Jetta, this model seems aimed at the family on a budget. The more you pay for the Jetta the larger the engine. Expect the fuel-economy to be in the mid-26 mpg range for most powerplants.

Volkswagen Beetle is new. In fact so new that we can only surmise it well be larger, quicker, and hopefully, quirkier. It should be priced well under $20,000 unless you want a hotter version. Worth the wait if this is your meat.

 Volkswagen Touareg is a real off road SUV. This model can be ordered with a hybrid drivetrain that can create 375 horsepower while still delivering over 23 mpg in mixed driving. In reality, this is a superior vehicle to the Porsche Cayenne and costs less.

 Volvo is now owned by a Chinese company, but they would be foolish to change the safety image that this marque has nurtured over the years. The S60 is a good looker and can be ordered with a 3.0-liter turbocharged inline 6 making 300 horsepower. Pricing should be well below $40,000, but the safety features make it well worth it for a family. Volvo is a class leader when it comes to pedestrian safety as well and some models actually stop the car when a person is detected in front of the vehicle.

The Compleat Guide to Family Sedans: Finding the Best Car Comparison

By The Car Family

For more in-depth reviews go to

http://www.motorists.org/carfamily/home/best-new-cars-for-2008/

(What makes our take on family vehicles of note is that we evaluate them as a family. No other media outlet provides this type of insight. )

Update: Please note that General Motors no longer allows us to test its vehicles and thus we can not provide an assessment of their usability and quality.

Okay, there needs to be a clear definition of what a family sedan is before we go further. In our test we selected those sedans that could comfortable hold at least four people, have a luggage friendly trunk, and provide something special whether that be handling, resale, or even value pricing. We also didn’t evaluate sedans obviously not primary meant for families such as the Subaru STi. As well, we only reported on those vehicles we have tested.

Here are our reviews, grade, and the reasons from most expensive sedans too least costly.

For those with a short attention span here are the outstanding sedans:

Best large family sedan: Ford Taurus and Toyota Avalon

Best midsize family sedan: Ford Fusion, and Honda Accord

Best sporty family sedan: Infiniti G35

Best compact family sedan: Toyota Corolla

Best small family sedan: Nissan Versa, Hyundai Elantra

Best station wagon: Subaru Legacy

Best luxury family sedan: Lexus LS, Mercedes E-Class Bluetec

Best Green Family sedan: Toyota Prius

Best Family Value: Nissan Altima 2.5

Outstanding sedans by price range.

Over $100,000 Mercedes S Class. Civilized, sporty, and solid.

Over $60,000

Lexus LS. Unbelievable smooth and powerful and loaded with features.

Over $40,000 Mercedes Bluetec diesel

Between $30,000 and $40,000 Infiniti G35

Under $30,000 Toyota Avalon

Below $25,000 Ford Taurus,

About $20,000 Ford Fusion

Over $15,000 Toyota Corolla/ Suzuki SX4/Ford Fusion

Under $15,000 Honda Fit/ Nissan Versa/ Hyundai Elantra/ Mazda 3

The Car Family Favorites

Mom’s Favorite:

The Audi A6S. Good handling, good fuel mileage, sturdy chassis, nice interior, and only needs larger trunk opening to be in my garage. Second choice Infiniti G35 S. Same feeling as with the Audi, but crisper and the interior is not as snazzy.

Dad’s Favorite:

The Mercedes Bluetec. Great performance, room for five, and you can always brag about the30 plus mpg you are getting. Second choice Saturn Aura. Simply a terrific value

Not-Working woman’s view: Since I am unemployed despite a MIS and a MBA I would go with Nissa Versa. Handy and gets exceptional gas mileage with a vast cargo area. Second choice, probably the Mercedes C Class. I like the interior and cutting edge exterior.

Almost ready to graduate male’s view: Well, working part time making open source computers and servers wholesale to the public no less, (http://www.eracks.com/) I would like a car that has the best electronics and so the Lexus products appeal to me. Secondly, I like the Chrysler sedan with the optional six cylinder engine. It looks interesting and holds plenty, but the low cost and the electrics are really worthwhile. If I was rich I would get the V70 Volvo, but that isn’t a sedan and I’m not rich.

Reviews in order by manufacture suggested retail cost:

Bentley’s Continental Flying Spur has all wheel drive, 552 horsepower, power everything, and starts around $170,000.  Bentley has raised its prices and this is no longer a bargain. Better values exist elsewhere.  . Our rating: BReason: Cost, vast amounts lost at resale.

Maserati Quattroporte

We haven’t been able to test one of these; however, for the $110,000 price tag it should be great. Whether or not you can find service for these unique vehicles is another matter. We always have reservations about expensive cars that aren’t available to the press, but a new public relations effort appears to be underway. If previous models are any indication this Maserati will have a stunning interior, good handling, and a lot of Italian sex appeal. The acceleration is not as potent as you would think from a Maserati, but that should be somewhat remedied with a larger V 8 due out soon. As for now we can’t provide you with a grade. Our rating: Incomplete

Lexus LS 600h L

We have tested this flagship from Lexus and it is loaded with features, including electric motors that provide added thrust to the already powerful V8 engine. The cost, $105,000 does question whether or not it is worth more than $50000 over the terrific Lexus LS without the doodads. If you can afford it this is a fine car and those in the backseat are going to be treated like royalty with their own sound system and more. A stunning testimony to what Lexus can bring to the consumer in the form of electronics, engine performance, and fuel economy as this large sedan consistently nets 24 mpg or more. Our grade B-. Reason cost.

Audi 8

The $93,000 S version or the $70,000 L model are both all wheel drive and smooth sedans with outstanding interiors, some easy to use electronics, and enough under the hood to challenge any road situation. The S version with its V10 and 460 horsepower engine is much faster and has a firmer suspension. Neither version is quick due to their bulk, but both are beautiful inside and out. Our grade C. Reason resale and cost to repair aluminum body panels.

Mercedes Benz S Class

Starting around $87,000, Mercedes offers a variety of sedans, but all of them have one thing in common and that is performance and features. You can even get the bargain priced S63 AMG version that offers world-class performance, or settle for the V12 6.0 liter S65 for $194.000 and never have to use the slow lane again. Fuel mileage may be a concern even from the base V8 with 382 horsepower, and you have to master the Command system that controls many of the vehicle’s functions, but this is a solid, roomy, and has a bank vault feel to it. Our grade B-. Reason interior design and complexity

BMW 7 Series

Probably the best handling of the expensive, large sedans, the 7 Series is loaded with features, but still has that iDrive to contend with. There is an abundance of room and the Li version even has more room. You can order a V8 or V12 with a six-speed automatic

A very nimble large car, but one that never lets you forget it is a large car. Our grade B-. Reason, cost, complexity. $75,800

Audi S6

More nimble than the big BMW and with the 5.2 liter V10 is both fun to drive and quite elegant. Not the handler of the Bimmer and the Audi still has an overly complex MMI audio and navigation package that needs to be mastered. Nice backup camera, but Infiniti’s is better. Unless you really love the sound of the V10 get the Audi 6 and learn to accept the fact you aren’t driving the fastest luxury sedan. Well packaged and pleasing. Our grade B-. Reason complexity cost of aluminum body repair. $72,350

Mercedes-Benz CLS Class

The most attractive large sedan, the coupe like styling looks great, but it does make entry into the rear seats a bit of a struggle for tall passengers. The smaller windows also reduce visibility, but the view to the front is excellent. Tastefully done, the COMAND audio and navigation system needs to be simplified for more functions. Besides the great looks Mercedes is back in the business of providing some exceptional engines. The CLS550 has a 5.5-liter V8 that produces 382 horsepower and 391 pound-feet of torque and the AMG version has a 6.2-liter V8 that is jet like in performance with 507 horsepower and 465 lb-ft. of torque. This is the sedan to own if you like going fast in a straight line. Sexy and strong. Starting about $68,000. Our grade B. Reason, rear seat entry, complexity.

Jaguar XJ-SeriesRiding on an aluminum chassis and combining the most elegant of interiors with a stately style and powerful V8, the Jaguar XJ sedan is a dignified and sporty vehicle that has just enough idiosyncrasies to make it royal. The seats aren’t thrones, and a lot of the current electronics are lacking, but that isn’t necessarily bad. You can order the plebian model with a ready to romp 300 horsepower and 310 pound-feet of torque at your disposal. Or really live with the XJR version with its 400 horsepower and 413 lb-ft of torque. Just point and shoot and the old girl lifts up her skirts and runs. Inside there is leather and wood most everywhere and except for the confusing controls and the fickly transmission lever this is as close as you are going to get to being a king for $66,910. Our grade B. Reason, lack of cargo area and ergonomics.

Lexus LS 460

In 1989 we bought one of the first Lexus LS models. It was fully loaded, well priced, comfortable, and had terrific dealer service. It raised the bar for all sedans with a superior stereo system, Corvette type horsepower, and a smooth ride. Nothing has changed. The 2008 Lexus is so remarkable it is unremarkable. It is fast enough to stay with the rest of the standard sedans and its terrific interior design, lighting, V8, and eight speed transmission all help you relax. Since this car is not meant for canyon cutting the suspension is a bit soft, but the 4.6-liter V8 makes 380 horsepower and 367 pound-feet of torque make it all worthwhile. You can even order a long wheelbase version. Safety equipment everywhere, even a pre-collision feature that readies the car for a crash by provoking the seatbelts to tighten and the force the brakes into action as soon as the pedal is touched. A touch screen makes the electronics simpler to operate and there is even a side box for additional controls that are not used as frequently. Perfect for those who want to get from point A to point B with as little bother as possible. For $63,835 you’ll have yourself one quiet ride. Grade A-. Reason, soft suspension.

Lexus GS

Available with a potent V8 or six cylinder engine at a price point from $44,000 to $53, 000, these Lexus models don’t offer as much room as the Lexus LS, but do add a lot more zoom. And, the styling is more youthful than it big sister, too. Refined with just the sound of its optional 4.6-liter V8 reminding you that this girl can kick sand in anyone’s face. Of course, the slender styling means that the rear seats have more limited headroom and are tight for three adults. As all Lexus sedans, this one drives the rear wheels and has an eight-speed automatic transmission while still getting over 20 mpg. Truly a remarkable feat. Inside there are ten airbags, a Pre-Collision System that uses radar to anticipate an accident, and all sorts of wood and aluminum trim pieces. Great graphics, lighting and ergonomics, but the excellent ride and handling are what set this Lexus apart. A unique combination of performance, safety, and proper care of the passengers all propelled by engines that takes less fuel than its performance suggests. Note: We own a GS. Grade B+. Cost.

Mercedes Benz E-Class

Starting at $51,500 the redone E-Class deserves a most improved medal, as it is clearly better in every way than the previous model. The ride, handling, and performance added to the abundance of safety features make his a compelling consideration. You can even get all wheel drive and a wagon version. Our favorite is the Bluetec diesel engine with great fuel mileage and the promise of excellent resale. The downside is the central control unit and the emotionless brake feel. The AMG versions are extremely fast considering that the base 3.5-liter V6 is good for 268 horsepower. Look for fuel mileage with this unit in the 21-mpg range. If for some reason you need more pep the E550 features a 5.5-liter V8 with 382 horsepower, but fuel mileage barely gets to 18 mpg. Our very favorite is the E320 Bluetec features a 3.0-liter turbo diesel V6 that churns out 210 horsepower and is fast while recording fuel mileage above 26 mpg. This is a must drive. Those who don’t care about renewable resources and want to live life in the fast lane should opt for the terrific E63 AMG with a 6.2-liter V8 providing a staggering 507 horsepower. The E-Class also comes with a seven-speed automatic.

Safety wise the E-Class is loaded with stability control, antilock brakes, front and rear side airbags, full-length side curtain airbags and a PreSafe feature that anticipates a crash and automatically secure occupants. The seats are excellent and firm, the materials first rate, and the controls and gauges easy to read except for the COMAND interface that takes time to master. The rear seats have room for three and the trunk is fairly large.

Don’t expect this Mercedes sedan to perform as a BMW 5 Series, but do expect it to be more comfortable and family oriented. The Bluetec is a must drive. Grade A-. Reason, comfort, safety and with the diesel engine, economy.

Jaguar XF

This $51,200 all new sedan from Jaguar has not been tested by us. It is handsome and on paper appears to be money well spent, but until they reach the press fleet we reserve our opinion. It is certainly worth the price difference over the S-Type. Grade: Incomplete

Jaguar S-Type

A unique looking vehicle, the Jaguar S-Type has a kind ride, interesting look, and the usual superior interior look for the $48,500 price. Unfortunately, this is an old design that, although not common on the street, needs to be freshened or be overtaken by its sparking new companion, the XF. The 3.0-liter V6 has 235-horsepower. If you order the V8 you own 300 horsepower and the R version gets a supercharger and brings forth 400 horsepower. This is not a competitor for the BMW or Mercedes, but is in a class where its price tag places it against the Japanese Infiniti and Lexus sedans. Fuel economy is about 20 in mixed driving

The S-Class has six airbags, large disc brakes, traction and stability control as standard. The interior has gobs of nice leather and wood trim, but the J-gate remains so shifting by hand is never as easy as just letting the old girl do it herself. The most interesting aspect of this Jaguar is the CATS suspension system that really improves cornering and overall handling. If you like its look there can be no substitute for saying you own a Jaguar. Grade C. Resale, fuel economy, and center control interface.

Acura RL

Strange, the Acura RL is an extremely well furnished, eager to please and luxurious sedan priced at just over $49,000 that not many people seem to appreciate based on sales. It is all wheel drive and loaded with electronic features but lacks the performance people seem to want in this price range even though the 3.5-liter V6 has 290 horsepower and has a five-speed automatic transmission with shift paddles. The RL also has a Super-Handling All-Wheel Drive that sends traction to each individual wheel to improve traction.

Safety wise this mundane styled Acura has antilock disc brakes, front seat side airbags, full-length side curtain airbags, stability control system and more. The interior is elegant with wood and leather most everywhere, but understated is the theme. The center dash has a wide range of buttons as this Acura is loaded with toys, especially with the must have Technology package. There is voice control, heated seats, and a nice sized LCD screen. Honda’s GPS is the best, too. You can spend hours learning how to adjust all the devices the RL is equipped with.

Driving the RL is relaxed and there is enough power to please most people. The handling and ride are soft and the fuel mileage is about 22 mpg. We are a little worried about all those electronics as the car ages and so we recommend an extended warranty that covers electric concerns. Grade B-. Reason, complexity, gas mileage, and resale.

Lincoln Town Car

Lincoln’s Town car is just an old fashioned rear wheel drive sedan with acres of room and a price tag of $46,000 that places it against competitors that offer far more of everything except room and price. With styling like a limo and a wheelbase that makes parking a concern, the Lincoln has a 4.6-liter V8 with 239 horsepower that barely gets 18 mpg in mixed driving due to the weight of the vehicle.

Safety comes in the form of front side airbags, traction control and a lot of metal. The interior is, well, big. The trunk is enormous at about 21 cubic feet, and you can even order an L model that adds more room in the back seat. The gauges and controls are simple to use and everything works well. Driving this sedan is simple, just aim and wait. The ride is quiet and subdued. Once up to speed the Town Car can run with the best of them up to triple digits. Don’t sell this car short if you want a lot for your money. Grade C. Reason resale and fuel mileage.

BMW 5 Series

We like the 3 Series better, but for a family the 5 Series makes more sense with its larger size. The 7 Series is just bigger and far more expensive. So this model is the Goldilocks choice for us at just over $45,000. Stick with the basic features; avoid the electronics as much as possible, and you are going to have an enjoyable ride. However, with the Euro increasing against the dollar parts might be a concern after the “everything is covered” warranty wears out. As most BMWs the ride and handing are the standard for all cars. There is also quality everywhere, but the iDrive should be avoided at all costs and we absolutely dislike the styling of the newer models. It looks like the back and front are melting. As well, the BMW asks a premium dollars when you buy them due to demand.

The engines include the base 528i with a very underpowered 230-horsepower inline-6 and the 535i with a terrific twin-turbo 300-horsepower inline-6. If you feel the need for more speed there is a 360 horsepower engine, too. We like the 6-speed automatic, but abhor the SMG gearbox. If you want all wheel drive you can also order it with the sedan or wagon.

Safety wise there is stability control, antilock disc brakes, front-seat side airbags and front-and-rear side-curtain airbags with an optional rear seat side airbag, a lane departure warning system, and a night vision system. Safety scores were good, but side impact scores needed improvement. Always order as many airbags as a company offers. Comfortable seats and the iDrive and LCD screen control system dominant the interior with buttons for a whole host of actions from radio stations to GPS maps. The trunk is rather small and the look of the interior is bland. This is a driving car first, and a fashion statement secondly. It can run the canyons without breaking a sweat, provides gas mileage in the 21-mpg range, and even has an optional active steering system. Our grade A-. Cost, and complexity offset drivability and resale.

Infiniti M

Starting around $42,000, the Infiniti M35 and V8 powered M45 are vastly underrated sedans. These cars have plenty of electronic, luxury, and performance. It is easily as good as it gets for a luxury sport sedan and is the equal of the BMW in almost every way except cost and resale. The only drawbacks are its controls and road noise from very wide, low profile tires. Everything else is well worth a test drive. For example, there is a lane departure warning system and a switch to a hard drive-based navigation system with real-time traffic that helps get you around traffic snarls. Both engines have plenty of pep, but neither can really break the 20-mpg mark in mixed driving. You can order the M35x as an AWD model.

The safety features include antilock disc brakes with brake assist, stability control, traction control, front-seat side airbags, full-length side curtain airbags and active front head restraints. The interior trim is quite nice with leather and rosewood elements providing a subdued effect. The seats are very comfortable, and the gauges are easy to read and well lighted. Night lighting is also well above average. The dash has a lot of buttons to master, but the basics such as heat and cooling require little effort to learn.

Driving the M is enjoyable, but there is reduced side and back visibility due to the large columns and high trunk. The steering is very firm and the ride can get loud over coarse pavement. Essentially there is more sport than luxury in the M and thus its sales target is more BMW and less Lexus and Cadillac. Grade B- Gas mileage, noise, tires.

Cadillac STS (No updates)

Cadillac DTS (No updates.)

Volvo’s S80 is a large sedan priced at under $45,000 that is nearly invisible to the buying public. It is unemotional and uninvolving and that is sad because the sum of its parts is impressive. Perhaps it is the understated interior or the soft handling that makes it a less than a stellar sales success, but we think the exterior is just too bland to draw a potential customer into its charms. Their loss. The 281 horsepower, engine comes with all-wheel drive and provides for a nice package, albeit a bit pricey. The keyless entry system opens a view to a leatherized interior with an array of options that can make this Volvo most everything but fast. The option packages are expensive and the cost of repair significant. We owned Volvos previously and they run forever, but at a cost in parts and labor that would render rationality inept. The newer models are even more complicated and so are recommendation is to get an extended warranty and enjoy the safety features while driving the S80 a long time due to the weak resale.

The base front wheel drive Volvo S80 comes with a 3.2-liter inline six-cylinder engine yielding 235 horsepower and 236 pound-feet of torque. You can also order a 4.4-liter V8 that provides 311 horsepower and all wheel drive. Gas mileage for all the high output motors seldom reaches 20 mpg in mixed driving and the base unit can muster 21 mpg using the standard six-speed automatic transmission. This transmission drives only the front wheels on base 3.2 models.

Safety is where Volvo excels. The S80 has antilock disc brakes, front-seat side airbags with separate sections for the chest and hip protection, full-length side curtain airbags, anti-whiplash front head restraints and pre-tensioning seatbelts for all passengers. Optional equipment is the use of cameras to monitor traffic on the side of the S80 and warning lights. There is also an adaptive cruise control system that warns of a possible collision and readies the brakes for action. The interior has the famous Volvo seats that are simply the best. The heater works rapidly and the rear seats are comfortable. The trunk is a good size.

When you drive the S80 it is smooth and soft. It goes about its job without much fuss, but with a car in this price range most people want a little more sizzle in their garage. Grade C-. Repair costs, resale, value.

Saab 9-5 (General Motors vehicle. No updates.

Lexus IS

Priced from $32,000 the IS is a compact sedan with little interior room for a family. That does not mean it isn’t a special car if you want sport and luxury in an affordable package. The IS 350 has a 306-horsepower V6 and they are now offering a V8 with BMW M type power. Hardly family oriented, though. The base engine is plenty spunky and only the very tight rear seat room and less than special fuel mileage spoil a really fun car to drive. Gas mileage is about 22 mpg and the ride is quite secure and surprisingly quiet.

Safety features include antilock disc brakes, traction control, stability control and a front-seat side and full side curtain. Optional equipment of interest is a pre-collision system and a cruise control that uses a radar sensor to determine an impending crash. The little Lexus automatically tightens the seatbelts and everything else. The electronics are fairly easy to master on the IS and the interior materials are more upscale than one might image looking at the rather plain exterior. Regardless of your engine choice this is fun car to drive and the exhaust note encourages you to play out your fast lane desires. The rear wheel drive IS that is our favorite is the 250 that make a healthy 204 horsepower. Look for 25 mpg in mixed driving. The trunk is rather small and the looks of the IS are hardly anything to write home about. An excellent riding Lexus with a great dealer network. Grade C+. Reason: Interior space and expensive options.

Audi A4

We actually got 38 mpg with an Audi A4 on the highway with the CVT and four family members on board. This is quite a car. With a price just over $31,000 the Audi A4 has a handsome interior room for four adults, and has good handling and performance. It is the equal of the Lexus IS and BMW 3 Series in many ways, but is more family oriented. The 2.0-liter turbocharged inline-4 delivers 200 horsepower while the optional V6 creates 255 horsepower. If you order an Avant you get Audi’s Quattro all-wheel drive. Unless you live where you need such an option stick with the front wheel drive model, especially those with the continuously variable automatic transmission and save big on fuel costs while still enjoying the punch of a turbocharged engine.

Safety wise the Audi has antilock brakes, traction control, stability control, front-seat side airbags and full-length side curtain airbags. Optional rear side airbags are available. Crash scores were good. The interior is terrific. The seats are firm and the controls easy to read and reach. The GPS is complicated to master. Folding down the rear seats can expand the trunk space. What the A4 offers a family is the enjoyment of having a performance oriented sedan with a deluxe interior, excellent fuel mileage, and a pleasant ride. Grade B+. Expensive repairs, insurance, and expensive options.

Jaguar X-Type

We thought this car was going to be a big hit until we sat in it. The interior just does not meet the Jaguar quality we expected and the seats were tight for everyone. With a $36,000 price tag we feel that there are better cars for the money and we would start by saving a few extra dollars and getting the S-Type. Grade D. Poor fuel mileage, expensive to repair, resale, crash test scores.

Acura TL

The one overwhelming negative about this Acura is the fact you are going to be hard pressed to get 20 mpg in mixed driving and the car requires premium fuel. Add to that the large turning radius and you have a $30,000 plus car that is more sport than family. Reliable, yes, but the excellent V6 engines haven’t got the torque of the competition and the wide tires and create more interior noise than one would anticipate. These front wheel drive sedans come with a 3.2-liter V6 that produces 258 horsepower and a five-speed automatic. The Type-S has a 3.5-liter V6 good for 286 horsepower and you can get a six-speed manual with this model. Either way expect your fuel mileage to be much less than the government figures. We were only able to get 23 mpg using cruise control on level highway.

Safety comes in the form of stability and traction control, front-seat side airbags and full-length curtain airbags. If you order the optional GPS you get a rearview camera. The Acura system is very good. The interior is crowded. There is very little luxury, although the workmanship appears excellent. The interior lighting is so-so but the headlights are first rate. The electronics are easy to operate and even has voice commands. These cars love to prove themselves in the canyons and the steering is excellent. The ride can be a little stiff on rugged roads. Visibility to the back and sides is constricted by the high deck and thick pillars. Grade B-. Interior space, premium fuel, large turning radius.

Cadillac CTS (No updates)

BMW 3Series

With a starting price of about $33,000 the BMW 3 Series has created a new iconic image for itself by offering braking, handling, and resale untouched by any other vehicle. It is still a great driving car, but the competition has caught up namely in the form of the larger Infiniti G and Audi 4. As for a family vehicle, even in station wagon form there is little interior room as in many such sports sedans. You pay a premium for a BMW in price and most likely insurance rates. The warranty as been extended to cover everything, including brakes and fluids. However, when they warranty ends we hardly recommend you consider an extended version. We have seen too many BMWs ruined by lack of proper care.

The engines are very refined, the suspension and brakes unparalleled, and the seats comfortable. The iDrive is too complicated and the interior is way too understated considering the price. You can get a six-speed automatic with steering-wheel-mounted paddle shifters and a 3.0-liter inline-6 rated at 230 horsepower or go for the 335i and earn yourself the right to put premium fuel into a tank that propels a twin-turbocharged 3.0-liter engine to 300 horsepower with a six-speed manual transmission to smooth it all out. You can even order all wheel drive. The 335i is very fast. Best of all you get pretty good fuel mileage with both of these engines with about 22 mpg in mixed driving a reality.

Standard equipment abounds with antilock disc brakes, dynamic brake control, stability control, run-flat tires, front-seat side airbags and full-length side curtain airbags and even a feature that wipes the brake rotors when needed. Crash results were pretty good, but avoiding accidents is the 3 Series best safety feature. The gauges use small font and the interior lighting isn’t so good. The headlights are excellent and visibility is above average, albeit the side view mirrors are quite small. There is room for four adults, but legroom is at a premium and the trunk is also a bit on the small side in holding with the sport sedan image. Driving the new 3 Series is always a pleasure and entertaining. It makes you want to take the long way home. Unfortunately, it is not a good family vehicle due to it space limitations. We recommend spending a bit more and getting the 5 Series. Grade B+. Reason, interior room, repair costs, premium fuel.

Infiniti G35

The most underrated family vehicle on the planet the Infiniti G35 has room, voom, and a darn nice interior for its mid $32,000 price. The V6 engine is outstanding and the braking, handling, and ride are among the best for the price. Stay with the automatic transmission and you have a sedan that can be whatever you want it to be from grocery getter to canyon cutter. The G35’s 3.5-liter V6 has 306 horsepower going to the rear wheels, although all wheel drive is an option. The five-speed automatic is very efficient and it offers a manual shift that has downshift rev matching to make downshifts seamless. These are very fast cars that can run with the competition and still offer room for four or more. Gas mileage is 22 mpg, but you need premium fuel.

Safety features are antilock disc brakes with brake assist, front-seat side airbags, full-length curtain airbags, anti-whiplash front head restraints, traction control and stability control and an optional Technology Package that anticipates a crash and prepares the car and passengers by tightening things up. The interior is both sporty and classy. There are special touches everywhere including aluminum or wood trim, nice leather and only the lack of good cup holders and storage bins detract. The rear seats are roomy considering. The G35 is a remarkable car and clearly can challenge the BMW 3 Series. It loves to be driven and the 3.5-liter V6 is always on call. Grade A-. Reason premium fuel

Mercedes C-Class

It is no secret that Mercedes has had quality problems in the past. To its benefit they have redone the C-Class and presented a fresher, more improved face to the world. It should pay off in this most competitive entry-level luxury segment with this $32,000 model. The result in a much sharper looking and driving automobile. It handles well, has great build quality, and has a quiet ride. Even the COMAND system of controlling vehicle functions has been simplified. Unfortunately, the GPS is still complex and the gas mileage in town isn’t all that great. We averaged 21 mpg in mixed driving with both engines. The C300 has a 3.0-liter V6 with 228 horsepower turns the rear wheels through a very smooth seven-speed automatic. You can also order all wheel drive. Stepping up to the C350 Sport you get a 3.5-liter V6 that makes 268 horsepower and 258 lb-ft of torque. Stick with the base engine and save, as it is fast enough. Safety features include front side airbags, full-length curtain airbags, active front head restraints, stability control, traction control and adaptive antilock brakes with brake assist. And there is more. This Mercedes cocoons it passengers in safety equipment both passive and active.

Neat and logical are perhaps the best ways to describe the interior of the C Class. There is little fluff here and even the COMMAND system has been restructured for ease of operation using a good sized LCD screen. There is a sophisticated audio option and a hard drive to run all of the goodies. The trunk could be larger, but you can order optional fold down rear seats, which we recommend. On the road it is immediately apparent that the engineers have made this a much better handling car. It is capable of being driven hard or soft and offers reassuring feedback and an abundance of suspension travel to level the most roughened road. Grade B+. Reason. Cost of options, repair costs, fuel economy

Volvo S60

The Volvo S60 is a fairly expensive car for what you get considering it’s nearly $32,000 price tag. Yes, it has great seats and rides well and carries the safety reputation Volvo has maintained through the years. But the rear seats are tight, and turbo lag is noticeable, and the suspension is soft. None of these by themselves are a concern, but with the high price of repairs, and we have owned several Volvos, and the low resale, we lost $10,000 in two years on a popular station wagon, we would make sure you love the idea of a Volvo before you buy.

The engine choices for the S60 2.5T is a turbocharged 2.5-liter inline five-cylinder with 208 horsepower and a five-speed automatic transmission (all wheel drive is an option) or a 2.4-liter inline-5 with higher turbo pressure that pushes 257 horsepower to the front-wheel-drive. Gas mileage is notable better with the former engine. We were able to get 22 mpg in mixed driving whereas we were registering 19 mpg with the more potent motor.

Safety is abundant with antilock disc brakes, stability control, front side airbags, full-length side curtain airbags, anti-submarine seats, whiplash-reducing head rests and OnCall. Crash test scores were good. The Volvo S60’s interior is functional but doesn’t feel upscale unless you order the leather upholstery and Dolby Surround Sound options. The controls are nicely weighted, but the pictograms depicting the various functions can be difficult to understand at first. There is seating for five, and although front occupants will bask in the comfort of the Volvo’s orthopedically designed seats, rear passengers will likely find the legroom tight. Trunk space measures just under 14 cubic feet, and the rear seat folds in a 60/40 split on all trims. On the road the engine is competent, but hardly strong. Even the optional 2.5T does not thrill. The ride is kind to your back and the brakes instill confidence, Grade C. Reason Resale, performance.

Lincoln MKZ

We are sure that the Lincoln MKZ for $31,000 is a comfortable riding vehicle, but one must question why it costs nearly $8000 more than its sister, the Mercury Milan, which is nearly identical except for a less powerful engine and standard features. Of course, these are nice to have such as heated and cooled seats, satellite radio, and the hands-free entertainment and communication system that were developed with Microsoft. The engine in the Lincoln is also stronger than the Milan with a 3.5-liter V6 creating 263 horsepower that run through a six-speed automatic transmission. The all wheel drive system is optional. Fuel mileage was around 21 mpg in mixed driving.

Safety in provided in the form of ABS, traction control, front side impact airbags and full-length head curtain airbags and an innovative feature that is designed to keep the air bag against the window at all times. Crash test scores were good. We very much dislike the interior the tree ton plus Lincoln Navigator that exceeds the weight limit of most community streets and some highways. So we were not pleased with the MKZ’s interior with its SUVish looks. That being said, the Lincoln does offer a good-sized rear seat and trunk that stores just under 16 cubic feet of bargains. The rear seats also fold down. The ride is comfortable and the engine is adequate for highway driving. We much prefer the Ford Fusion and the Mercury Milan. Grade D. Cost, resale, interior.

Nissan Maxima

Nissan’s Maxima is long in the tooth and has rear visibility problems. Worse, its sister vehicle, the Altima, is a much better family vehicle. In fact, one of the best. The $29,000 Maxima has abundant interior room a terrific engine and a sporty suspension. The steering lets the suspension down and it rides harshness over rutted roads. The
V6 engine and the CVT are responsive and we got 21 mpg in mixed driving.

Antilock disc brakes, brake assist, traction control, front side-impact airbags, side-impact head curtain airbags help the Maxima get good test scores. The interior is vast with a strange glass roof letting in some light. The glass does not move. The seats are designed for comfort and the dash and gauges are easy to read. Night lighting is good. The trunk is large and the rear seats fold down, too. The Maxima stops well, accelerates briskly, and provides an enjoyable driving experience. Grade B. Resale, ride quality, fuel mileage.

Saab 9-3. (General Motors product. No updates.)


Toyota Avalon

Other than the Ford Taurus, the Toyota Avalon offers the most usable room for the dollar starting at about $28,500. The Avalon is a Lexus in all but name. It is refined and well built. If you aren’t interesting in performance this is the best large sedan you can buy in the price segment. Although the rear seats don’t fold down, the interior space is enormous as this long sedan offers room for five plus sized adults. The six-speed automatic transmission moves the power to the front-wheel-drive Toyota from a 3.5-liter V6 rated at 268 horsepower. And you can get close to 28 mpg on the highway, with an average of 23 mpg in mixed driving almost remarkable considering the size of this sedan. The sound system is also exemplary with a nine-speaker audio system with MP3-compatible CD changer and auxiliary jacks providing a stellar listening environment. The seats are large, a bit soft, but comfortable for long trips.

Antilock disc brakes, front-seat side airbags, side curtain airbags for front and rear passengers and a driver-side knee airbag come with every Avalon and safety options include stability and traction control. Crash scores were all excellent. The interior has easy to read dials and gauges, controls that are simply to understand, and you can even get heated and cooled front seats. The trunk is not as spacious as the size of the car would indicate. Driving the Avalon on the road is a pleasure, but in town there are some visibility problems to the side and rear. The steering does not provide much feedback, but the Avalon is quite capable of handling emergency maneuvers and concerning easier than we thought. This is a large sedan that might be too much for some families who would be better suited to a Camry. Grade A-. Small trunk.

Pontiac G8 (General Motors product. No updates.)

Buck Lucerne (General Motors product. No updates.)

Kia Amanti

Well, you certainly are going to look hard to find a better initial value than a well-loaded Kia Amanti for under $27,000. Vast interior, great warranty and a surprising lush ride make this an under appreciated vehicle. The one striking feature is the different exterior look. The Kia has a 3.8-liter V6 and a five-speed automatic transmission that yields about 20 mpg in mixed driving. It is pretty quick for its size.

Safety features include antilock disc brakes, active front air bags, side airbags and full-length side curtain airbags. Always consider an optional package that includes stability and traction control systems on any car. The Amanti’s crash scores were good. The interior is spacious and there is room for five adults. The accents are understated and provide a luxurious look that belies its cost such as a power point in the rear armrest. The trunk is large, but the seats don’t fold down, although there is a small pass through. Driving the Amanti is a lot like driving an older American sedan. It has a soft ride and does not take to corners gladly, but on the highway it really scoots. Grade B-. Reason: weak resale, suspension, lack of dealerships for warranty repairs on the road.

Mercury Grand Marquis/Ford Crown Victoria

Simply not as good as the new Ford products, such as Taurus, unless you want rear wheel drive and a V8 engine. Priced around $25,500. D. Reason, poor gas mileage, soft handling, resale.
Hyundai Azera

The Hyundai Azera is well priced at just over $25,000. It is a bargain with a great warranty, nice interior and supportive engine. On the other hand the gas mileage isn’t that great and the build quality hasn’t been proven over the years. Standard equipment includes 17-inch alloy wheels, satellite radio automatic transmission, and air conditioning and more. The suspension is tighter than previous models and the engine selection includes a standard 3.3-liter V6 that has 234 horsepower and gives 22 mpg in mixed driving or a 3.8-liter V6 that creates 263 horsepower and gives the same miles per gallon because the engine is not working as hard with a full crew onboard. The front wheel drive sedan has a smooth shifting five-speed automatic and a full array of safety equipment that includes antilock disc brakes, traction control, stability control, active front head rests, front side airbags, rear side airbags and full-length side curtain airbags. Crash test scores were good.

The interior looks regal and there is an abundance of small touches that make it look like a much more expensive vehicle. The seats are fairly comfortable and the interior is large with room for five adults and a huge trunk that opens wide. This trunk and loading area should be a model for the industry. The ride is subdued and quiet. The car is fairly fast and the brakes work well, although the brake pedal feedback is numb. For all the world this car feels like a compact car when you drive it. Grade B. Reason: resale, fuel mileage, lack of dealers when traveling.

Chrysler 300

What’s a big car like this doing in a price segment like this? The answer is eating up a lot of new car sales. In its variety of forms the $24,500 Chrysler 300 can be purchased in everything from a frugal family hauler to a tire frying grand touring machine with just the flick of one’s credit card. Available in all wheel drive, this is a big sedan with show car looks and some real downsides such as poor visibility and lackluster fuel economy.

You can order the 300 with such trendy features as LED accent lighting, adaptive cruise control, a surround-sound audio with iPod interface, a Sirius Backseat television babysitter, a hard-drive based MyGIG multimedia system, and navigation. We like the 3.5-liter V6 with its 250 horsepower. However, if you must you can get the 300C with a 5.7-liter Hemi V8 and its horsepower or the 300C SRT8 is powered by a 6.1-liter V8 and 425 horsepower and 420 lb-ft of torque. Fast, but not fuel efficient in case you cared with under 20 mpg in mixed driving the norm even with cylinder-deactivation technology. Safety equipment, besides airbags, on most models includes ABS, traction control, stability control, and optional and full-length side curtain airbags.

The interior cabin has plenty of everything except headroom, and only a smallish trunk makes it less than a small limo as far as passenger use. Gauges and controls are easy to understand, the amber colored steering wheel is some models very sheik, and the seats are comfortable.

Driving the 300 is simple and the handling is exceptional considering its size. There is nothing to be said bad about the larger engines, except to question whether you really need the extra expensive even if resale might be better. Grade B-. Good value, but the reduced vision is a constant concern as is the fuel mileage and small trunk.

Volvo S40

This is a fairly expensive small car for about $25,000. It is well furnished and has terrific seats. You can get all wheel drive, too, for the Volvo S40 to frolic in the snow easier. The interior is clean and only its engine takes away from the enjoyment of driving this sedan with a family onboard. The overwhelming problem with this sharp looker is that if you don’t order the optional turbocharged engine you can’t get really get full use out of the suspension. The base engine is 2.4-liter inline-5 cylinder unit that produces 168 horsepower. However, the 2.4 engine’s horsepower is slow to come online, especially with the five-speed automatic. The optional 2.5-liter inline-5 creates 227 horsepower and is much more capable of hauling a family. And, with the larger engine you get better gas mileage as rated by the government of over 30 on the highway. We got 25 in mixed driving. You can order this Volvo with all wheel drive. Make sure you order the optional xenon headlights that turn as the steering wheel turns to illuminate curves better as night lighting is only average without them. The interior lighting is good and getting in and out is fairly easy even with a baby seat. Safety equipment includes antilock disc brakes, traction control and stability control, front side airbags, full-length head curtain airbags, and whiplash-reducing head rests for all outboard positions. Crash scores were good. The interior is very modern and fresh, downright Swedish. Thankfully, Volvo has ended its stereo knob controls that made it nearly impossible to find a station without taking your eyes of the road. The new set-up is very good and the seats are the best. The trunk isn’t large, but the rear seats fold down to provide more cargo space. Driving the Volvo quite different with the base engine and the T5 turbocharged one. The 2.4-liter engine needs time to reach its peak even with the manual transmission, as the power is not really available to over 4000 rpm. The T5 option is better, but why not just pay a few extra dollars a month and get the larger S60? It is a better family vehicle. Handling is sporty with the S40 and the brakes and steering feel is good. Grade C: Reason, resale, repair costs, cargo space, base engine.

Volkswagen GL1

Formerly known as Jetta, This $24,500 Volkswagen GL1 is a good driver’s car, with a nice ride and perky engine. The suspension is firm and the proven 2.0-liter engine a willing worker thanks to the turbo boost. The car deserves a better-looking exterior for this sporty vehicle. The 200 horsepower engine works well with the six-speed Direct Shift Gearbox transmission that provides the best balance of quickness and fuel economy. Overall gas mileage was 25 mpg in mixed driving. Driving is entertaining and parking is made easy with a fairly small 35.1 feet turning radius, which is quite good for a front wheel drive vehicle. Safety wise the Volkswagen has antilock disc brakes, stability and traction control, front side airbags and full-length head curtain airbags. Crash scores were good.

The interior has a first rate feel and the quality is evident as the controls are all nicely weighted and easy to reach. The steering wheel is flat bottomed and the seats are firm and perhaps a little too small for some occupants. You can get four adults in this GL1 with ease and the trunk is very large at about 16 cubic feet. Beware that the option packages can raise the cost of the GL1 a great deal so separate your needs from your wants. Grade A-. Reason. Resale, option costs.

Volkswagen Passat

Volkswagen’s Passat sedan is an interesting vehicle with a base price around $24,000 that is underrated and fun to drive. Available with all wheel drive, the Passat has the proven 2.0 turbocharged engine with 200 horsepower, and a good-sized interior. The optional V6 engine adds little to the family value of the Passat, and it is costly. With this model check your options carefully because they can increase the cost considerably and the weak resale does not justify extras other than those that deal with safety. The same could be said for the all wheel drive option, or 4Motion. The six speed manual transmission is a little difficult to shift rapidly and so we recommend the six-speed automatic. Gas mileage for these cars was 24 mpg in mixed driving on premium fuel.

Safety features include antilock disc brakes, traction control, stability control, anti-whiplash head rest restraints, front side airbags and full-length head curtain. Seriously consider ordering the optional rear-seat side airbags. Crash scores were good. The interior is tasteful, if a bit dark. You start the car with a card key that fits into a slot in the dash. It takes a while to master this procedure and we question why it was done, but we can’t deny it is simple to use. The trunk is mall, but the rear seats fold down for extra space. On the road the ride is supportive, yet comfortable, with just a hint of lean on corners. The engine is eager to please and only outside wind and tire noise provide a sensation of speed. Grade B. Cost of repair, trunk, and resale.

Mercury Sable

See Ford Tarsus ($24,000)

Buick LaCrosse (General Motors Product. No update)

Ford Taurus

This is a large car and Ford has finally seen fit to give its $24,000 the engine it deserves with a 263-horsepower V6. The ride is smooth and uninvolving, the trunk enormous, and the interior spacious. You aren’t going to get more car for your money. That being said, it is perhaps has too much room for smaller families and the Ford Fusion is a better fit for those. You can even get the Taurus with all wheel drive. The high seating position gives you an excellent view of the road and the ride is quiet and relaxing. The big news is the engine and the 3.5-liter V6 when combined with the standard six-speed automatic transmission gives tremendous fuel averages on the highway considering its heft with 25 mpg easy to maintain. In town that drops to about 20, but only the more expensive Toyota Avalon can compete with this Ford.

Safety comes in the form of antilock disc brakes and traction control, and front side- and full-length curtain airbags. You can order stability control, power-adjustable pedals and rear parking sensors. This Ford is one of the safest, smoothest, and most spacious cars you can buy. The interior is well thought out. There are even eight cup holders. There isn’t much headroom, but everywhere else you can feel why people who like their comfort are going to like the Taurus. Indeed, the front passenger seat can fold flat and the Taurus’ 60/40-split rear bench also does giving you ladder hauling size cargo space. This Ford isn’t much for handling corners and the transmission takes it time downshifting, but you won’t have any problem entering highways and with a car this size you are more than likely to find someone willing to give you an opening. Grade B+. Reason resale and handling.

Pontiac Grand Prix (General Motors product. No update)

Chevrolet Malibu (General Motors Prroduct.  No update.)

Dodge Charger

This is a world-class bargain at under $22,000. It is interesting to drive and only the lack of good visibility mars its driving enjoyment. Available as rear wheel or all wheel drive, this large sedan has excellent suspension and can even be ordered with a high-powered V8 engine for those with the funds to supply it with fuel. The Dodge Charger is also heavy and the rear seat head room is compromised by its styling. Of the interesting options the information and communication MyGIG system is worth exploring. More importantly, Chrysler has a new limited lifetime power train warranty. And, what a power train. The base unit is a very useful 2.7-liter V6 with 178 horsepower that works with a four-speed automatic transmission. Also consider the optional 3.5-liter V6 with 250 horses if you carry a family frequently. Chrysler also offers two V8s for those determined to burn fuel at record rates. The base engine provides about 23 mpg in mixed driving and the others, including the R/T version with its 340 horsepower V8 and 6.1-liter V8 with its very thirsty 425 horses record gas mileage figures in the teens.

Features such as standard antilock disc brakes, brake assist, traction control and a stability control system help keep the family safe, but we would certainly order the optional full-length side curtain airbags. Crash scores were good. There is an abundance of room in the cabin, but the rear seat headroom isn’t so good due to the roof design. The interior is well designed, easy to use and the seats are comfortable, if a bit soft and wide for some. The trunk is large.

Driving this rear wheel drive sedan depends on your choice of engines. The more potent the engine the more fun, but at a cost. The exhaust lets you know the engine is working at all times and there is better than expected handling. The largest engine we would recommend is the 3.5-liter V6. Grade B+. Reason fuel mileage, resale, and visibility.

Toyota Prius

What can you say about the most fuel efficient, family friendly sedan? Well, it does not have enough cargo capacity and its handling isn’t confidence inspiring especially on windy days or when passing large trucks. Outside of that this is a great $21,300 sedan. Using Toyota’s Hybrid Synergy Drive with its 1.5-liter gasoline engine and two electric motors, produce a combined 143 horsepower, but in reality there is a little over 100 horses online at any one time. Regardless of the numbers, the Prius is slow, but steady. It does its job well, and that is to save gas and move four people in reasonable comfort. Look for fuel mileage about 40 mpg in mixed driving. With compact cars safety is a concern and the Prius comes with antilock brakes, brake assist, traction control, front side airbags and full-length side curtain airbags. Crash scores were good.

The interior is utilitarian and different starting with the short electronic shifter located near the steering wheel. The gauges are easy to reach and use and the seats are comfortable. The hatchback as a good sized 14.4 cubic-foot “trunk” and the rear seats fold flat. The problem is the usability of this space any large packages blocking rear visibility. Driving the Prius takes a while to master. The engine shuts off at stops and there is a shudder when the gas engine starts and stops. The brakes also have a different feel. Nothing terrible, just different. To help on fuel consumption you can go up to around 25 mpg without starting the gas engine unless you are using the air-conditioning. We have been in traffic jams and traveled over 25 miles without using any fuel. The steering feel is very light and the parking ability is wonderful. The Prius is most geared towards being a commuter car as the gas mileage falls on high-speed highways. Although the Prius was our car of the year when it first came out and when it was redesigned, it still isn’t our favorite family car in this price segment despite great resale and economy. Grade B+. Reason, usable cargo room, highway manners, unknown costs of battery replacements.

Mitsubishi Galant

Mitsubishi Galant starts at $21,100 and has an attractive look, a great warranty, and good handling. What is missing is quality. Everywhere you see a great idea, but cheapened with inferior materials probably due to Mitsubishi’s struggle for survival. The Fosgate stereo is very good; the ride a bit stiff, but very athletic overall, and the interior has adequate space. The rear seats do not fold down and if you select the optional V6 engine you need premium fuel. The base inline 2.4-liter four cylinder engine makes 160 horsepower and is mated to a four-speed automatic. Gas mileage was about 23 mpg in mixed driving. A Ralliart with a 3.8-liter V6 with 258 horsepower has a five-speed automatic but barely gets 20 mpg in mixed driving.

In terms of safety, the Galants have the usual front and side airbags, but almost everything else is an option. Crash scores were good. The interior is well lighted and the gauges easy to use. The white-faced dials are difficult to read due to the small font. There is plenty of room for four, but the seats are too soft for us and the trunk is also on the small side. This is an enjoyable family sedan to drive and the suspension leaves no doubt it is sporty. The steering is good and there is plenty of sporty feedback on all types of surfaces. Grade B-. Materials, fuel efficiency, resale.

Subaru Legacy

Families and Subaru Legacies go together; especially for those who live where inclement weather is a concern. The base Legacy sedan is comfortable and comes with all wheel drive for about $21,100. If it weren’t for the expensive repair costs this would higher rated and resale is a concern. We owned Subarus in the past and found these two problems persisted, especially the cost of parts. The other consideration is the lack of energy from the base engine and the lack of cargo space. The interior is very well done and the materials feel first rate. On the down side the options are very expensive and the more deluxe models can cost well over $30,000. The base engine in the 2.5i models is a 2.5-liter boxer four-cylinder that makes 175 horsepower. It is slow but steady. The GT models get a turbocharged 2.5-liter engines that create a much more driver friendly 243 horsepower. The 3.0 R Limited has a 3.0-liter six-cylinder that is smoother, but only has 245 horsepower. The base model has an available four speed automatic transmission and the others have a five speed. We much prefer the automatic to the manual transmissions as the latter has a linkage system that can prove difficult to shift in a hurry.

Safety wise there are antilock disc brakes, front and side airbags, full-length side curtain airbags and whiplash-reducing front headrests are all standard. The crash scores were excellent. The interior is warm and the gauges easy to read. The seats have a good feel and there is good room in the front. Rear seat passengers may not be so lucky as shoulder room is tight and so is the trunk. Fortunately, the rear seats fold down. Seriously consider the Outback wagon over the sedan. On the highway the Legacy feels totally in control with some wind and tire noise. The base engine takes its time so order the turbocharged engine if you travel in the mountains or with a full family onboard. The steering is very good, but the suspension is not really sporty due to the long travel needed for it to be taken off-road. Grade B. Expensive to repair, weak engine, and small trunk.

Honda Accord

Always a family friendly and fuel frugal sedan, the $21,000 the new Honda Accord is much the same with a more unique look and slightly larger interior. We really like the four-cylinder model and the manual transmission that enables you to get 30 mpg on the highway. The interior is understated, except for some curiously placed buttons. Resale is excellent. The L sedans have a 2.4-liter four-cylinder that produces 177 horsepower and that is all you really need. If you upgrade to the 2.4-liter four-cylinder engine you get a whopping 190 horsepower. This is the standard power plant on the EX sedans. A five-speed manual transmission is standard with a five-speed automatic optional. There is also a 3.5-liter V6 with 268 horsepower that provides true sports car type acceleration. Perhaps the best feature of these engines is their fuel figures. You can get well over 25 mpg in mixed driving with the former engines and about 22 with the V6. This is as good as it gets. The ride is good over all surfaces, but the new car does not feel as athletic as the previous model. The brakes have good feel and visibility is exceptional.

In terms of safety the Accord has antilock disc brakes, stability and traction control, front side airbags and full-length curtain airbags. The interior works well, but we found the seats a bit flat and the center console too busy. The rear camera and GPS is the best in the business, except for perhaps the Nissan’s rear view monitor. There is a lot of room in this new model, but not in the trunk where it has a useful, but not up to class standards, 14 cubic feet of trunk space. Grade A-. Smallish trunk, difficult finding base model.

Saturn Aura (General Motors product. No update.)

Mazda6

For just under $20,000 Mazda offers a tight, midsized sedan that is enjoyable to drive, has a conservative interior, and comes in many forms. However, the Mazda engines are short of grunt and economy and the Sport model is priced around $30,000, which makes it a difficult buy considering resale and lack of pep. On the other hand the handling is sizzling.

The standard engine is the 2.3-liter, four-cylinder engine that makes 156 horsepower. It is barely adequate. The upgrade is the 3.0-liter V6 that makes 212 horsepower. In mixed driving with the V6 we were hard pressed to come anywhere near the 22 mpg figure. Mazda loads its sedan with safety features such as antilock disc brakes, traction control, front-seat side airbags and full-length side curtain airbags. The interior is quite fresh and the seats are comfortable, but rear seating is tight. The instrument panel is easy to read, but the exterior lighting, even with the optional xenon lighting, is only average. The trunk has over 15-cubic-foot trunk, but the trunk lid is heavy and difficult to lift. The rear seats fold down to expand capacity.

Without doubt Mazda builds some excellent handling vehicles. They are fun to drive, but the engines let them down in both performance and economy. Grade C. Reason fuel mileage, resale, and power.

Mercury Milan

As its sisters from Lincoln and Ford, the Milan is a great bargain at $19,000. It has a roomy interior, above average handling, available all wheel drive, and a price that leaves the competition in the dust. Mercury is offering a plethora of options, but if you can live without a reverse parking sensor and Mercury “Sync” multimedia system with its MP3 and cell phone integration you can probably be driving this Mercury for far less than a Camry or Accord.

The base 2.3-liter four-cylinder engine makes 160 horsepower and meets the strict Partial-Zero Emissions Vehicle certification in California. You can also have the optional 221-horsepower 3.0-liter V6. Both engines are adequate, but nothing more. Look for gas mileage in the 23-mpg range. Safety includes antilock disc brakes, front-seat side airbags and side-curtain airbags. There is room for four adults, but rear seats are tight. The trunk is fairly large and the rear seats fold down. Driving the Milan is enjoyable with a nice combination of sport and luxury in its handling. The ride is quiet, but the engine needs more umpf if you want to challenge to the suspension. Grade B-.Engine performance.

Toyota Camry

One of the best selling sedans, the Camry and its base price of $18,750 this Toyota is non-offensive and meant to be. There is good interior room, a very fuel-efficient selection of engines, and some options that can turn the base model into something sportier. The interior is quiet and the feeling is always one of sitting in a library with little to disturb you. The front drive Camry’s come with a 2.4-liter four-cylinder that feels far more powerful than its 158 horsepower rating. There is also an Ultra Low Emissions certification engine. We love the four-cylinder engine and it never fails to surprise us with gas mileage in the 27-mpg range while providing a spunk response. Safety wise Camry has antilock brakes, brake assist, front-seat side airbags, full-length side curtain airbags and a driver knee airbag with stability control and traction control optional. The interior is filled with storage bins and easy to read dials. Attention to detail is everywhere and the trunk is the only disappointment with a smallish 15 cubic feet of room. Grade B+. Reason. Excellent engine and mileage, but a smallish trunk, increased price, and the improvement in the competition make buying a Camry for family transportation less of a done deal.

Chrysler Sebring

Newly redone the Chrysler Sebring at $18,700 is a sedan that fails to impress. It has a lot of option choices, and isn’t hard to look at, but the base engine isn’t good enough and the optional V6 takes the price up over $1000 more. The base model gets standard satellite radio and an in-dash CD changer and can be ordered with front-wheel or all-wheel drive. The 2.4-liter inline-4 is said to make 173 horsepower but it feels weaker. The Touring is priced over $1000 more and worth it, especially with the 2.7 liter V6 and its 189 horsepower. The much more expensive Limited model has a 3.5-liter V6 with 235 horsepower and a six speed automatic transmission. The government ratings are 21-mpg city/30 mpg highway for the smaller engine and 19/27 mpg for the 2.7 liter. The front 3.5-liter V6 gets a not very good 16/25 rating.

Safety wise the Sebring scores are average. The interior has soft seats and a lot of plastic. Driving the Sebring is a study in patience. The ride is smooth, handling is adequate, and acceleration tepid. There is a spacious cabin and a good-sized trunk. Grade D. Resale, engine, handling, and interior.

Dodge Avenger

This car has a dramatic flair and an agreeable price tag at $18,700, but the real plus is the variety of options. This front wheel drive unit comes with either a four-cylinder or V6 and can be order with all wheel drive. The 2.4-liter inline four-cylinder engine has 173 horses while the optional 2.7-liter V6 produces 189 all running through a four speed automatic. You can order a R/T model with a 3.5-liter V6 capable of 235 horsepower and a six-speed automatic transmission. The mpg rate for the base engine is 21/31 according to the government and the other two engines are rated at 19/27. If you use ethanol the mpg rate drops from one to three miles per gallon.

Safety equipment finds the Avenger with front side airbags, full-length head curtain airbags, antilock brakes on most models, and a very useful tire-pressure monitor. The Avenger is certainly better than the model it replaced, the Stratus, but it still is a sub par car unless you get the suspension and engine power of the R/T that transforms this sleepy driving sedan into a playful family hauler. The interior is quite simple and the seats are wide and comfy. The gauges are difficult to read and their isn’t much to show off, but if you order the multi-talented MyGIG navigation and audio system you can spend hours showing it off. The rear seat is adequate for two adults, but the seats aren’t that comfortable. The trunk is small, but the rear seats fold down for comfort.

The engines aren’t the most cutting edge and they don’t like to be rushed, but the 2.7-liter is worthy of a test drive especially in passing situations. However, the R/T option makes this and entirely different car so beware that the extra $5000 might be money well spent. The brakes on the base models aren’t the best, but crash scores were good. Grade C-. Price of options, small trunk, resale.

Nissan Altima

Priced under $19,000 and with an abundance of deals under that figure, the Altima brings a lot of features to the family and packages it well. The engine is frisky, the CVT works well, the interior is well laid out and the options defy logic. A 2.5-liter inline-4 with 175 horsepower is the engine to have and we got nearly 28 mpg with it in mixed driving. You can also order a 3.5-liter V6 with 270 horsepower and a six-speed manual transmission. The Altima also comes as a hybrid and you can get some great deals on this model as the masses continue to flock to the Toyota Prius and Camry versions. The Altima is fast and frugal. Safety features include front and seat side airbags, and full-length side-curtain airbags and antilock brakes. Crash test scores were good.

Nissan has the best CVT units and when added to the easy to read gauges and LCD readouts this is an easy car to drive. The interior has a quality feel to it and the myriad of options can make this sedan everything from a commuter special to a luxury liner. The stereo is above average and the handling is responsive and fun. The engine is eager to please and the optional rear view camera the best there is. Add to that a terrific GPS unit and you have an undervalued family sedan. Grade A-. Reason: resale.

Pontiac G6 (General Motors product. No update.)

Ford Fusion

Priced exceptional well starting around $18,000 the surprisingly roomy Ford Fusion is a nice combination of sporty and family practical depending on your option choices. The low price means that some Fusion models cost less than the smaller Ford Focus. It is available in all wheel drive and is loaded with standard features. The engine choices include a 2.3-liter, 160-horsepower four-cylinder engine that meets Partial-Zero Emissions Vehicle certification. This is almost as good as clean air gets. We don’t recommend the manual transmission, as the five –speed automatic works well. If you want more power the 3.0-liter, 221-horsepower V6 comes with a six-speed automatic. We got 26 mpg in mixed driving with the four cylinder and 23 with the V6.

Outside of its interesting exterior, what sets the Fusion apart is it’s handling. This car is very European in feel and outside of a bit of noise from the engine delivers a quiet ride with some gusto. If you want more handling check out the Sport Appearance package that yields larger tires, rims, and some trim pieces a bargain for under $900. And with the dollar falling, those American made pieces on this Ford should stay the same while the import prices rise. Safety wise the Fusion has antilock disc brakes, front and side airbags and side-curtain airbags. You need to order the option traction control on the V6 models. Unfortunately stability control is not an option, but the Fusion has good resistance to rollovers and good crash scores as well. The interior is easy to understand and use. The gauges could be larger and there needs to be a few more readouts, but the overall impact is European in quality and look. The cabin is very spacious and the trunk is nearly 16 cubic feet with a fairly low liftover. The rear seats also fold down, and, on the upscale models, the front passenger seat folds down to allow for the carrying of really long items.

Driving the Fusion is a pleasure. It is hard to believe you are driving a Ford. The ride is quiet, the engine perky, and the steering very communicative. This is not the fastest vehicle in its class, but it runs or regular fuel. It could use a little more power and some gauges could be easier to read, but for the money this vehicle is hard to ignore, especially with so many deals going on and the fact that there are dealers most everywhere to take car of warranty issues. Grade A-. Engine

Hyundai Sonata

There is little to dislike from the base price Hyundai Sonata at $18,500. The interior is spacious; the ride quite nice, there are lots of standard features, and the warranty is excellent. On the other hand the engines aren’t that gas miserly and the transmission isn’t the best. We found the base 2.4-liter four-cylinder with 162 horsepower very good. You can also order a 3.3-liter V6 with 234 horsepower and a five-speed automatic. Stick with the standard unit. Safety features include antilock brakes, traction control, stability control, front and side airbags, full-length side curtain airbags and active head restraints. The crash scores were very good. Inside the Sonata there is a quality feel. The steering wheel both tilts and telescopes and has redundant controls. The seats are wide and fairly comfortable and there is room for four adults. Most of the controls are easy to reach and understand. The trunk is huge.

Driving the Hyundai is quite nice, but don’t push it. This is a car set up for the quieter side of driving and it shows when hard cornering enters its path. The headlights are average and so is the interior lighting. The brakes are good, with little pedal feel. The cabin is quiet with little wind noise. The engine seems eager, but the automatic transmission slow to respond. Grade A- Resale, fuel economy.

Volkswagen Rabbit

At $17,575 the Volkswagen Rabbit is an expensive compact sedan. It has a nice ride and

wonderful build quality. The problem is the price. If you order options this sedan quickly moves into Volkswagen Jetta territory. The 2.5-liter inline five-cylinder engine produces 170 horsepower which runs through the front wheels via five-speed manual transmission. It is a good unit, but for more money consider the six-speed automatic. We averaged 25 mpg in mixing driving, but expected more. Safety comes in the form of four-wheel antilock disc brakes, front side-impact airbags and full-length head curtain airbags with stability control and must have rear seat side-impact airbags optional. Crash scores were good. The interior is fun. The gauges are blue with red pointers and the fit and finish are excellent. We did notice that the colorful lighting was difficult to read at times and that the headlights and interior illumination needed improvement, too. The seats are good, the seating position very good, and you just feel good when driving this little daredevil of a car. This is not really a sports car, but a nice combination of sporty and comfortable ride makes it an enjoyable companion. Unfortunately, it just does not have the room for a family. No Grade. Transfer to Unmarried Singles Class.

Subaru Impreza

It is so different in appearance that you are probably not going to recognize the new Subaru Impreza even with its familiar under $18,000 pricing. It is subtle looking; nearly Toyotaish in appearance, and the interior is so much improved it hardly is recognizable as well. Better seats, better ride, better everything. But we still miss that sore thumb styling. You can also order this bargain all wheel drive four-cylinder sedan with the powerful turbocharged versions dubbed WRX and WRX STI. Except for the very fun to drive turbocharged versions you can get 25 mpg in mixed driving. However, the horizontally opposed 2.5-liter four-cylinder engine and its170 horsepower and 170 pound-feet of torque are not for those in a hurry. The turbocharged engines provide WRX models with 224 horsepower and the STI a staggering 305 horsepower.

Standard safety features on the Impreza include antilock brakes and side curtain airbags and you must order the optional rear disc brake option with any model as well as ABS and such unique features as a hill holder for manual transmissions. Don’t forget the

active front head restraints.

Interior space is much better than previous models and the sedan even has larger doors, thankfully, for easier entry and exit. There are also framed side windows that help make the ride quiet for this compact. The rear seats have a 60/40-split-folding rear seat comes in both the sedan and four-door hatch and the trunk is good sized as well.

Overall a very fun car to drive, but more reserved than previous models. Our grade C+. Reason repair costs and unexceptional fuel mileage. If you live in areas that have an abundance of snow move the grade up a notch.

Volkswagen Jetta

A real bargain, the Volkswagen Jetta is undervalued in terms of ride and performance and with the optional diesel engine is a first choice of the commuters. It does everything well for the $17,000 price and the 2.5-liter engine with 170 horsepower is capable of good passing safety. The interior is nice, but not exceptional, and the interior room very useful. Grade B. Quality ride. Resale concerns. With the diesel engine this would be an A-


Kia Optima

Kia’s Optima is a $17,000 sedan that is well featured, has good crash test scores, but has very bland styling and very low resale despite an exceptional warranty. The base engine yields 162 horsepower form its 2.4-liter four-cylinders. It is well worth considering the optional 2.7-liter V6 and its five speed automatic transmission. Although rated at 185 horsepower and the extra power is needed. Fuel mileage is about 25 mpg with either engine in mixed driving, but the four-cylinder engine is inadequate when the car is fully loaded.

Safety comes in the form of front side airbags, full-length curtain airbags and an Electronic Stability Control Package with antilock brakes, stability control and traction control on all but the base model. Excellent crash test scores. The interior is quite plain, but there is good room for those in both the front and back and the seats are comfortable. The trunk is nearly 15 cubic feet and the rear seats fold down. There is nothing here to dislike, it is a non-offensive interior that works well, but lacks any special elements that would make people sit-up (pun intended) and notice. Driving the Optima is also bland. The transmission isn’t quick to shift, the engine hasn’t that much punch, and only the sporty suspension makes this a sleepy ride. This is a good commuter car with some exceptional deals being offered. Grade C-. Resale, engine, interior design.

Nissan Sentra

This quirky compact is as utilitarian as it gets. There is nothing wrong with it, but for $16,000 or so dollars you can find more entertaining vehicles that do most things as well or better. It does have a spacious interior and a nice interior layout. The engine is noisy, the handling is average, and the manual transmission does not like to be rushed. We do like the CVT and if offers exceptional fuel economy. Also standard are ABS, cruise control, power windows, locks, and keyless entry. The 2.0-liter inline four-cylinder engine with its 140 horsepower drives the CVT through the front wheels with exceptional fuel economy considering the spaciousness of the Sentra. We got 29 mpg in mixed driving. There is also a SE-R with a 2.5-liter four-cylinder that provides 177 horsepower and a SE-R Spec V with 200 horsepower.

Nissan’s Sentra has front-seat side airbags and full-length head curtain airbags as standard and you have to move to more expensive models to get antilock brakes. Crash scores were very good. The seat material is very grabby, and by that we means things stick to it such as hair. You have plenty of room for four and there is an abundance of headroom. Unfortunately, there is something different about the interior that is you feel like you are riding lower than you really are due to the seating position. The trunk is large and useful. Driving the Sentra is relaxing and there is plenty of passing power. The handling isn’t’ as good and the interior isn’t as quiet as other models. Grade B- Resale, interior materials, noise.


Saturn Astra(General Motors Product. No update.)

Honda Civic

Clearly one of the best and most handy and most interesting of the small cars, the $15, 500 Honda Civic can be bought with a hot rod engine, as a hybrid, with a compressed natural gas engine, and even lends its chassis to the valuable and useful Honda Element. This is the leader in this segment based on resale, reliability, safety, and fuel efficiency. On the down side it is low and getting a baby seat in and out isn’t he easiest of tasks. The gauge cluster is more for the youth oriented, but overall this is a car with few equals. Order the 1.8-liter four-cylinder engine that makes 140 horsepower for its front wheels to use and either order a five-speed manual or optional five-speed automatic and watch the gas gauge stay put for hours on end. You can also order a compressed gas using Civic, but it takes up too much room in the trunk. We don’t recommend the hybrid either for the lack of cargo space. And, the Si version and is nearly 200 horsepower is just for those who like to shift a lot. Good performance, but not practical and not meant to be. We averaged 33 mpg in mixed driving with the Civic and it kept right up with traffic.

Civics come with front seat side airbags, full-length side curtain airbags and active head restraints, and antilock brakes. Crash scores were good. The interior is plain with a distinct layout that has a digital speedometer and gas gauge at the top of the dash. It is not our favorite, but not difficult to adjust too. However, everyone in the car can read it so beware that junior can clearly tell what laws may be stretched. The Civic is nimble, easy to park, but getting in and out may require a little more dexterity than taller vehicles. Grade A-. Reason resale, fuel mileage, and good safety scores.

Suzuki SX4

We like the underdog and we like Suzuki. Sure the resale isn’t that great, but with a ten year warranty on the more expensive items to replace why sell it anyway. The SX4 is good looking, has all wheel drive, and is fun to drive for a sedan. There is good interior room, and the controls are easy to reach and use. At around $15,000, and most dealers are ready to deal, the Suzuki does not have the upscale materials inside and the stereo lacks the latest in auxiliary hook-ups. The rear seats have a 60/40-split so that you can expand the cargo area into the trunk. The sedan makes due with a very nice 14 cubic feet of easy to access space.

You can now save even more by order a front wheel drive only model (SX4 Sport) that we recommend unless you need to travel frequently in inclement weather. It is a good handler. Also order the optional stability control in every vehicle you are considering as it is the best safety feature you can order outside of airbags, which the Suzuki offers for the front and side passengers. As a true mark of its bargain nature, you get traction control standard in this model. Fuel economy is around 23 mpg with a five-speed manual. This isn’t a fast car, but it is fun to drive. Grade B-. Resale and performance.

Ford Focus

The Ford Focus has had more makeovers than an aging starlet. Nevertheless, it is fun to drive, is a bargain at $15,000, and is inexpensive to repair. Despite this the Focus is not the class of this price range even though it should get the most improved award. The ride is much better than before; the steering has more feeling, and the controls easy to use and master. Clearly the years in production have given the engineers time to refine every element on the Focus. However, they had cost restraints and so they were limited in what they could do. For example, the exterior is still unworthy of Ford and the interior is more basic than that seen in the competition of which they is plenty. The 2.0-liter inline-4 cylinder has 140 horsepower which is just enough with the five-speed manual and a little weak with the optional four-speed automatic. Fuel mileage is sparkling and we were able to record 30 mpg in mixed driving consistently with the automatic. If you can get a good deal on this revised Focus seriously consider it.

You get front seat side-impact airbags as well as head curtain airbags for both front and rear seat occupants, but antilock brakes are optional. This is a base price car so you shouldn’t be surprised that there are a great many options that can drive the price nearly to $20,000. The gauges are easy to use and read, the night lighting below average, and the seats are fairly easy to adjust. An interesting feature is Ford’s Sync system that is a hands-free voice-recognition interface that was developed by Microsoft and Ford. The Bluetooth function is quick to use and offers many advanced technologies. The rear seats have good legroom for a compact car and the steering and handling are good. The ride is quiet and the visibility above average. This is a nice car that has been refaced and in a world that is looking for fresh faces it may attract some new buyers. Unfortunately, there are a lot of younger faces out there and so the Focus must reply on getting the parts by working for less. Consider the Ford Fusion for a few dollars a month more. Grade B-. Expensive options, resale.

Scion xD

Scion xD is a $14,700 replacement for one of our favorite gas misers, the Xa, but there is really nothing in common between the two as the new model is much more competent and feature imbued. As with all Scions options are everything. The base price is insignificant as most everything is an option to help individualize this toaster styled ride. The four-door hatchback has some shortcomings in legroom and a very different gauge layout. Other than that the 1.8-liter four-cylinder engine that offers 128 horsepower and 125 pound-feet of torque while sipping fuel to the tune of 27-mpg city/33 mpg highway with the manual transmission. Safety equipment is always important in small vehicles and this Scion is laden with antilock brakes with brake assist, stability control, traction control, front seat side airbags, full-length side curtain airbags and front active head restraints.

The new xD’s interior needs to be seen and used, as it is quite different. The steering wheel does not telescope and the seats are quite upright. Nothing wrong, just different, but, hey, isn’t that what a Scion is all about. Grade B. Reason options can drive price. Side winds are a concern.

Toyota Corolla

Roundly criticized by the old boy reviewers for being boring, we quite liked the all new nearly $15,000 Corolla for just that reasons. There is something to be said for a sedan that can comfortable hold four adults, has good cargo room, and gets 31 mpg in mixed driving. This is a reliable vehicle that can be very expensive to buy if you don’t watch your option choices carefully. It does basic chores well like the workhorse it is, but don’t expect much fun even with the sporty version. The 132-horsepower, 1.8-liter four-cylinder engine works well with the standard five-speed manual, but even with the optional automatic the gas mileage is terrific. You crash scores were good with optional equipment and make sure your Corolla has the optional side and side curtain airbags. The interior is quite nice with a lot of headroom and the ergonomics very good. The Corolla has a large trunk and there are lots of storage areas in the dash and center console. If you opt for the Corolla XRS you have a 2.4-liter engine with 158 horsepower, but fuel mileage drops by ten percent. This model has four-wheel disc brakes, too. The interior has a lot of storage and an interesting double glove compartment. The trunk space is average.

Excellent reliability. This is the best commuter car by far. It is good handling, gets terrific gas mileage, has room for four, and superior resale. On the other hand it is boring to drive and can be more expensive than the larger Camry if you don’t watch your options. Our grade B+. Reason, resale and fuel mileage and expensive options.

Suzuki Forenza

We like Suzuki vehicles. They have excellent warranties, are fun to drive, and have excellent pricing. However, the Forenza isn’t our favorite even with the versatile station wagon model. We would go with the newer SX4 model. The Forenza gets barely average fuel mileage in this price range and has a lot of needs. The 2.0-liter inline four-cylinder with 127 horsepower and 131 pound-feet of torque is really only spunky with the five speed manual transmission. Fuel mileage was 24 mpg in mixed driving. Safety equipment includes standard front side-impact airbags and four-wheel disc brakes. You get a fair amount of storage room in the Forenza and the station wagon offers 62 cubic feet of cargo space. This is one of the few affordable station wagons available. The $14,200 Forenza has a soft ride and needs a lot of coaxing to keep up with high-speed traffic. A nice looking vehicle, but one that needs to be bought at a good price. Our grade C-. Reason, resale, fuel mileage, few dealers, and reliability somewhat offset by great warranty and reasonable pricing.

Mitsubishi Lancer

Mitsubishi’s $14,000 Lancer is much different than the vehicle it replaces and well worth a look see if you can avoid looking a the resale figures. It is handsome and has very good handling. The new 2.0-liter inline four-cylinder engine has 152 horsepower and 146 pound-feet of torque that work well with a five-speed manual, but we prefer the CVT for its better fuel mileage and its Sportronic feature that has shift paddles behind the steering wheel that enables the driver to shift the CVt unit through six “gears.” With all sedans in this price range fuel mileage, safety, and cargo space is everything. Unfortunately a real world 25 mpg is the norm. Safety items include airbags for the front, side, head curtains and a very worthwhile knee airbag. You even get a tire pressure monitor. A nice car, but not a great one despite its attractive looks. Grade C. Reason, resale, few dealers, and performance

Honda Fit

A new Honda Fit is in the wings so this might be a good time to make a deal on this sweet little sedan. The 1.5-liter four-cylinder engine produces109 horsepower and 105 pound-feet of torque and even with the optional five-speed automatic with its steering-wheel-mounted paddles we still got 30 mpg. Very fun to drive and an abundance of interior storage room with the rear seats folded down thanks to the hatchback design. Safety includes ABS, front-seat side airbags and full-length side curtain airbags. It does quite well in crash tests. The interior is drab and the seats can be tiring to sit in for long periods of time, but the utility of the split rear seats makes this a winner. A bit noisy, but so much fun it is difficult to believe it costs under $14,000. Grade B+. Reason, versatility and mileage.

Chevrolet (General Motors product. No update.)

Mazda 3

The Mazda 3 is a thinking man’s Audi 3. It drives like a larger car and handles like a smaller one. It is inexpensive and for under $14,000 it is inexpensive for what you get. This Mazda comes as a sedan or hatchback, the latter we much prefer. It is the best of the subcompact group when it comes to combining fun to drive attributes with below average fuel economy. We were able to get 24 mpg in mixed driving. The ride is firm, the suspension ready for whatever comes its way, and the styling deserving of merit. Since Ford and Mazda share a lot of elements we wonder why Ford didn’t steal this car and abandon the long in the tooth Focus? As usual when less expensive cars are offered options can drive the price upwards from is come on in base price. Nevertheless, this zippy and fairly room Mazda is the best of the bunch for families who want sport and don’t have large children to haul around. Safety wise there are front seat side airbags and full-length side curtain airbags on all models and four-wheel disc brakes and stability control and you guessed it, they might cost extra on some models. Options need to be studied before purchasing this Mazda. Crash test scores were okay, but you must order side impact airbags in all small cars for safety.

The 2.0-liter, four-cylinder engine with its 148 horsepower is our recommended engine. However, to take advantage of the sweet chassis you can order the optional

2.3-liter four-cylinder rated at over 150 horsepower. There are so many options and interior packages that you can just about have anything you want from leather to heated seats to navigation to automatic climate control to everything but enough rear leg room. The trunk is below average in size for the sedan, but the hatchback with its fold down rear seats is the way to go with nearly three times the cargo space as the sedan. The Mazda 3 loves to show off. It is a performance car and with the larger engine can stay with much more expensive cars easily. There is some torque steer. Grade B. Reason fuel economy, complex options list.

Hyundai Elantra

This is a real buy at $13,895. The Hyundai Elantra is a great compact car and resale rates are bound to rise as the new engine produces excellent fuel mileage numbers. We were able to get 30 mpg in mixed driving. Although we miss the hatchback, the new model has a better ride, a spacious cabin, and a great warranty. The engine however, lacks the quiet sophistication of the Honda Civic, but 2.0-liter inline-4 engine’s 138 horsepower is worthy of a calling a little attention to itself. The five speed automatic works well and the front-wheel drive Elantra comes standard with antilock disc brakes, front-seat side airbags, full-length side curtain airbags and anti-whiplash front head restraints. If you buy the upscale SE you can also own the standard stability control and ABS brake assist. Crash scores were great. This is a tight compact loaded with features. The interior lighting is interesting, being blue, but difficult to read quickly. There is good interior room for four and lots of storage spaces and a fairly large trunk, too. Driving the Elantra isn’t as fun as the Civic or the Corolla, but it is priced less. The Elantra is a good deal. Grade A-. Reason, resale, clutch/shift on manual transmission.

Suzuki Reno

We don’t recommend the Reno even at its attractive $13,625 price and with an outstanding warranty due to its poor fuel economy. If you want a better product with more room and a better ride get the new SX4 for a little more.

Hyundai Accent

Priced under $14,000 the Hyundai Accent is a straightforward car with a good warranty and a nice ride. It is a price car and the engine is hard pressed to provide adequate performance with the 1.6-liter four-cylinder engine and its 110 horsepower simply underpowered for this front-wheeled drive car. Fuel mileage is good with 28 mpg possible with the four-speed automatic.

All Accents include standard front-seat side airbags and full-length side curtain airbags with antilock brakes standard on upscale models. Side crash scores weren’t so good. The interior is pleasant and there is a certain amount of sportiness to the ride. If you like a good warranty and can get this model at a good price seriously consider, but the Elantra is better and doesn’t cost much more. Grade C-. Resale, crash scores.

Kia Spectra

Another price car with a good warranty, the Spectra is a spirited ride with a comfortable interior and plenty of storage. Its engine is noisy and the suspension isn’t designed for aggressive actions. The Spectra5 hatchback is especially useful. Its 2.0-liter four-cylinder engine produces 138 horsepower with 27 mpg possible in mixed driving. Safety wise the Spectra has front seat side airbags and full-length side curtain airbags with antilock brakes optional. Test results indicate you need to order a model with side airbags, as scores were low in this area. A generous cargo area, good seats, and excellent warranty make the Spectra notable. Grade C-. Crash scores and resale.

Nissan Versa

For less than $13,000 you can own a truly unique vehicle in the Nissan Versa. It is just plain handy and economical. Unfortunately, it is also ugly in both sedan and hatchback versions. If you don’t mind the looks this is the car to own for commuting and general use. Mind you, this is not a canyon cutter with its ride is designed for comfort. The Versa lives up to its name being capable of hauling for adults easily while sipping fuel. The brakes could be improved and the engine with the CVT is a might weak at times, but for this price you can’t get more for your money. But beware of build quality and take your time deciding on what options you need. The front-wheel-drive Nissan Versa has a 1.8-liter four-cylinder engine valued at 122 horsepower. The standard transmission is a six-speed manual but we highly recommend the upgraded 1.8 SL model and its CVT that enables you to get over 30 mpg in mixed driving. You might get slightly better fuel mileage with the Honda Fit, but not as much utility or deals.

Safety wise the Versa has front-seat side airbags, full-length side curtain airbags and a tire-pressure monitor. Optional antilock brakes with brake assist are a must. Crash scores are good, too. The interior is very accommodating. There is plenty of room and you can even get a fifth adult onboard. The rear seats fold down with over 50 cubic feet of space available. Even the sedan has nearly 13.8-cubic-feet of room. Better brakes would make the Versa feel a tad more competent, but overall this is a star. Grade A-. Reason brakes and noisy engine.

Toyota Yaris

The least expensive Toyota, the under $13,000 Yaris gets good fuel mileage and is roomy inside considering its dimensions. The seats don’t feel all that supportive and the instrument panel requires some acclamation, but we did mention the price. The 1.5-liter four-cylinder engine has 106 horsepower and 103 pound-feet of torque and sips gas. We got over 32 mpg in mixed driving, The low price means that most everything costs extra such as antilock brakes, front seat-mounted side airbags and side curtain airbags, all of which you must order for a family. If you can afford it also go with the optional sliding and reclining rear seats. The Yaris is a good riding sedan considering its size and price. However, we much prefer the Scions, which may cost a little more, but are more enjoyable to ride and have more usable storage. Grade C. Reason. Options can easily drive the price into base Corolla territory.

Kia Rio/Rio5

Kia Rio and Rio5 are undervalued at $13,000 with a great warranty and standard features that cost more from other companies. The ride isn’t bad, visibility excellent, and with the Rio5 there is plenty of cargo space. Of course don’t expect much acceleration from the 1.6-liter inline-4 rated at 110 noisy horsepower. An excellent highway vehicle, we average about 28 mpg in mixed driving. Safety wise there is standard airbags most everywhere and you need to order the optional ABS to maximize your stopping ability in these tallish vehicles. The interior is quite attractive and the visibility excellent. The seats in the front and rear are fairly comfortable and there are a variety of storage areas. The real fun of this Kia is the way it handles. You can have a great deal of fun in these Kias as long as the road isn’t too unkempt. Grade C+. Reason resale.

Chevrolet Aveo (General Motors Product. No update.)

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Buick LaCrosse

by The Car Family

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 Buick has made a better, ah, Buick. Nothing more, and nothing less. If you like Buicks, this is the best one. If you don’t like them this model isn’t going to get many consumers to leave their Toyotas, Fords, and Chryslers unless they appreciate its understated looks and familiar accommodations.

The good news is that there aren’t many flaws with this car. However, it isn’t going to create much envy with the competition for three main reasons. First, the engine is not fuel efficient despite its ratings. If you get 20 mpg you are probably doing well. Secondly, the room in the backseat both in terms of legroom and headroom are not generous. Finally, the lack of some features that we feel should be standard such as side airbags, are extra cost options.

Buick is a big seller for General Motors and it now firmly holds the ground between the Cadillac and the Pontiac. It does so resolutely with a fine record of build quality and customer service. Unfortunately, for whatever reason, the Buick model line has not resonated well with the younger buyers. Indeed, the average Buick owner is well past 65-years-old. Thus the LaCrosse has being designed to appeal to younger buyers and it just may with a sportier feel and energetic engine. Perhaps what might most make it most attractive to the youthful customer are a streamlined roofline and more shapely shape. Unfortunately, that makes maneuvering in and out of the front seats an exercise that requires a supple body, as you have to lower your body and duck your head at the same time. It is not a difficult move to master, but it definitely is not for those who are not flexible. For them we recommend our favorite Buick, the Park Avenue or, if you need even better value, the Rendezvous van.

Buick has made the LaCrosse in three trim levels, the CX, the more sporty CXS, and the luxury oriented CXL.  The CX is the price leader and comes with the 200-horsepower, 3.8-liter (3800) V6, a power driver’s seat, a stereo/CD, and OnStar. If you upgrade to the CXL you find yourself sitting on leather, looking at a more luxurious trim level, and riding on alloy wheels. The CXS offers Buick’s new 3.6 liter V6 that produces 240 horsepower and is definitely more youthful in ride quality. It has a bigger set of wheels and sportier suspension. For those who dread the thought of getting into a frigid car in winter, Buick adds an interesting option in the form of a remote starter. All you need to do is point it at the frost covered LaCrosse and it jumps to life with its very fast acting heater and defroster preparing the interior for your highness’s entry. There is even a good- sized cupholder for the required early morning coffee cup.

Mom’s view: I am always interested in anything new from Buick since it has an outstanding reputation for build quality, resale (http://www.nada.com) and reliability. So when the all-new LaCrosse was announced we pounced on the opportunity to test it out. It is certainly a better Buick, but whether it has enough going for it to capture sales from the competition is uncertain.

Someone at Buick should find out a way to shut the trunk lid without getting his or her hands dirty. There is no handle. In addition, when you use the remote to unlock the rear deck lid it does not pop open high enough. I also found the glare from the chrome strip that runs the width of the dash annoying as it is reflected in the side window where you constantly see it when checking the mirror. There is more that I found needed to be explained by Buick designers. The combination of small side view mirrors, and large doorframes create blind spot on both sides of car. The seats have a manual rake

adjustment, although the fore and aft controls are electrical, and the lever is awkward to reach, as it is located far back on the side of the bottom cushion. I also have no idea whose idea it was to make the interior trunk release so bothersome. You have to have the car in park and depress the door lock for a couple of seconds to open the trunk lid. This caused me much angst at the airport where I was cited by the police for blocking the pick-up lane since I had the car in park in a no stopping zone. Yes, I am fighting the ticket.

Getting in and out of the front seats wasn’t as easy as it was on one of my favorites, the Buick Park Avenue. The A pillar cuts into the entry space. Once inside the layout is clearly not cutting edge, but old world in appearance. You can order three across front seat seating so the LaCrosse can carry six, but it would be tight. The plastic wood trim is not badly done but it is so dark and brooding that it looks out of place with the gray interior of the test car.

The instruments were easy to read, but I had a major complaint about the windshield wipers. It rained a great deal on our test and even at the highest speed they could not keep up with heavy rainfall. I am not talking about torrential, just above average, and it struggled.

My greatest disappointment with the LaCrosse was its poor gas mileage. On a trip with the family onboard and the cruise control set at 75 through the desert we averaged less than 20 mpg. This same trip with the more expensive Toyota Avalon saw 27 mpg.  The new V6 engine in our test vehicle has ample scamper power, but I never felt its 240 horsepower was as enjoyable as the old 3.8 with the optional supercharger providing the poke.

Safety wise the Buick had front dual-stage airbags and OnStar. The problem for me was that unless you order the more expensive CXS model the ABS is an option and even on that model stability control system extra, as are full-length side curtain airbags and a reverse-sensing system. I would like to see all these types of safety features as standard equipment on a passenger vehicle. If family genes are indication though, this should be a very safe vehicle as its sister, the Buick LeSabre, was listed as one of the safest cars of all time.

The driver’s information center came with current weather, gas consumption, fuel range, and time on the road readouts that we were easy to understand. I was surprised to see a steering wheel that both tilted and telescoped and I liked the size of the wheel and how it felt. Other items I liked about the LaCrosse were the OnStar, the ease of which you could change the stereo controls and cruise control features. The heater was superior and the heated seats had two settings. Satellite radio is also available and highly recommended if you travel a great deal.

On the road I noticed that the rear view mirrors needed to be slightly larger to improve side visibility and that the ride of the car was quite solid and, should I say, a little BMWish in feel. The engine was strong in this front wheel drive model, but I didn’t notice any torque steer. The transmission works well, although I would have liked to see an overdrive gear to get that gas mileage where it belongs on long trips.

Overall, for the price of nearly $34,000 (US) I felt like the LaCrosse should provide me with a more exceptional interior and exterior appearance. I am a fan of the understated look, but for that type of money I would like a little more bling.

Dad’s view: The real news here is the double-overhead-cam 3.6 aluminum V-6 with variable valve timing that creates 240 hp and 225 lbs. ft. of torque nearly everywhere along it rev range above 3000 rpm. It is quiet, has good pick-up, and appears ready to take its place under the hoods of the new Buick line-up. However, as all The Car Family stated, the gas mileage wasn’t very good.

I was frankly surprised at the handling the LaCrosse provided. This Buick uses an electric Magnasteer system for its power steering that provided fairly good feedback and is easily the most responsive vehicle in the Buick line-up as it takes the steering angle and vehicle speed into account before adjusting the power assist. A fully independent suspension with front strut and a rear tri-link suspension give it a well-dampened effect, but nothing Buick owners would find objectionable. The ride is fairly quiet and the aluminum engine cradle helps keep the weight down to 3500 pounds. You can tow 1000 pounds, according to Buick.

The gas throttle has an electronic control that takes a while to get used to, as it tends to respond to initial inputs more dramatically than other Buicks. The acceleration is good to 60 mph, look for a time around eight seconds, and it has enough energy to easily conquer hills with a full family onboard. The four speed automatic transmission is an excellent unit, but it does need that extra fifth gear to enable the engine to loaf more at speed and increase fuel mileage.

Clearly, the LaCrosse is a step in the right direction for Buick and should quickly make aficionados forget the Century and the LaSabre.

Young working woman’s view: This is clearly a Buick in both looks and treatments. Buick has improved the silence in the interior with its “Quiet Tuning.”  This was accomplished by using more sound-deadening materials and a special Sandwich-construction steel panels that is said to reduce noise, and thicker carpeting. It works, but don’t do a back-to-back drive with a Toyota Avalon or you are going to be disappointed.  The interior look is an acquired taste, but there is nothing that would detract a potential buyer except for the dreaded chrome strip alluded to by my mother. It is not only a distraction, but out of place in this understated vehicle.

Driving the LaCrosse is quite easy. It responds well, gives you enough road feel, and the car has more than enough speed. The brakes are reassuring with little dive under emergency stopping. I found it easy to park and roomy inside. It would not be my first choice, but owning this Buick owning one would not be embarrassing either and I think that is a credit for Buick in its quest to reach the younger buying demographic.

Young working male’s view: My singing career is starting to bud. Just sold 200 CDs to Finland. Who says the Europeans don’t know good tunes. Anyway, this Buick is just not in my field of vision and so I give my time to my Grandfather.

Grandfather’s, not working and not interesting in working view: Didn’t like it. Looked like a new old car. There wasn’t enough room in back and getting in and out of the front seats had me holding on to the top of the car so I wouldn’t hit my head. It wasn’t all that quiet inside compared to the Toyota Avalon we just tested, but it was cheaper. You get what you pay for. I expect you read that before. The trunk lid was hard for me to close. My hand kept slipping off the freshly waxed paint and there wasn’t any other place to grab it. I liked the Park Avenue much better. It even looked slinkier.

I really enjoyed the XM Satellite radio. I was singing along to all the top bands from the 30’s and 40’s much to the chagrin of my protégé, Mr. Simple Thoughts. Sort of interesting that I learned electronics by building a crystal radio set and now you get hundreds of stations without any static. Just pay the money. Being a veteran of these tests, this is my second thanks to my hip-hop rapping grandson, I prefer the Sirius satellite offerings more.

Since I have owned a number of Buicks in the past, can you say Roadmaster, I think that this one is quite good for the younger folks. I just felt out of place in it. Maybe progress isn’t what I thought it would be.

Family conference:  Although we liked the more expensive CXS with its many extra features, we encourage you to look at the less expensive CXS model with it proven 200-horsepower, 3.8-liter (3800) V6 that meets the stringent Super Ultra Low Emissions Vehicle (SULEV) standards if you don’t mind the floaty ride. However, if you want the well-optioned CXS prepare to see a sticker price of $33,750 (US) for the heated seats, traction control, side-curtain airbags and XM satellite radio. Either way you get a much-improved Buick, but be prepared to battle that chrome strip reflection and learn to duck your head. For all manufacture websites go to http://www.reacheverychild.com/business/auto/index.html